The Tesla Model S has been hit by multiple suspension failures described by owners as a “horror experience.”

Since the first Tesla Roadster hit the road, people have defaulted to Tesla’s lack of quality assurance. More than a decade later, the Palo Alto-based electric car maker still has quality control problems. Although the latest Model Y model has recently been exposed to some quality issues. But this time the main character is not Model Y, but the suspension failure of the Model S, the top sedan in the carmaker’s product line.

“Terror on a German highway,” a Swiss Tesla owner describes. On his way from Stuygart to Zurich, the car sped up at 200km/h (124mph) when it suddenly burst into a very loud noise on the brakes. In addition to a cloud of smoke that could be seen in the rear view mirror a few seconds earlier, the owner noticed that the Model S was clearly running to the right because one of the suspension beams had failed.

The Tesla Model S has been hit by multiple suspension failures described by owners as a "horror experience."

“When I ask Tesla on the phone if this is normal,” the Zurich-based dealer told the 90D owner, “it could be normal wear and tear.”

For a vehicle with 80,000 kilometers (49,710 miles) on its odometer, most of which is on perfect German and Swiss roads, this is a completely unacceptable answer.

The Tesla Model S has been hit by multiple suspension failures described by owners as a "horror experience."

It is also unacceptable that Tesla refuses to take on the loss during the warranty period, which expires in April 2020. If you’re curious about how much the Zurich dealer is repairing, it should be 7,569 francs or $8,225 at the current exchange rate.

The Swiss Tesla owner is not alone. In the same post on tff-forum.de, Model S 60D owner Amuthep reported that his beam was “broken this week” and had a mileage of 86,000 kilometers. “On September 16, 2020, I turned left while reversing, and when I reversed on the normal road, I heard metal, as if something had cracked.” He said.

A day later, in a heavy braking test, “an unsound loud bang” left the car lying on its back and he had to tow it to the nearest dealership for repairs.

The post also included a description from Model S 70D owner Klaus Grambichler, who explained that the Model S electric sedan broke a lower control arm while driving at low speeds.

Tesla’s fault exposure is not uncommon, but much of the focus is on autopilot-related features – most people are more inclusive of the iterative improvements to this emerging technology. Now, Tesla’s problems with the traditional mechanical part seem even more unacceptable.