A campaign to spread election scams via text message has emerged in Michigan

A campaign to spread election scams via text message in Michigan recently sent voters mis-information about “vote sensor issues,”media The Verge reported. According to the Washington Post, the information claimed that a “typoography error” led to the votes of those who voted for Joe Biden being transferred to President Trump, while the votes of those who voted for Trump were transferred to Biden. The scam information claims to come from the FBI.

A campaign to spread election scams via text message has emerged in Michigan

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel warned voters that the text messages were fake. “Voters in Dearborn are alleged to have texted you to make you think there was something wrong with the ballot sensor,” she tweeted. “Don’t be a hoax, it’s a scam!”

In Flint, automated voice calls have been trying to trick people into voting on Wednesday because of long queues at so-called polling stations. Nessel also debunked the claim, tweeting: “There are reports of multiple automated voice calls to Flint residents saying they should vote tomorrow because of long queues. Obviously, this is wrong to block the vote. There are no long queues, and today is the last day of voting. Don’t believe these lies! Let people hear your voice! RT PLS. “

A campaign to spread election scams via text message has emerged in Michigan

These campaigns are just two of a number of efforts to spread doubts about the outcome of the 2020 presidential election. In another campaign, automated voice calls have been warning people to “be safe and stay at home,” the Washington Post reported. These calls began to appear in the summer and increased before the election — in almost every city in the United States. Although they didn’t mention the 2020 election, a source told The Washington Post. “I think what they mean is stay at home and not vote.”

According to the New York Times, voters in swing states received the most mis-information about postal voting before the 2020 election. Between September 1 and October 29, there were 227,907 postal voting rumors in Pennsylvania, according to Zignal Labs, a media intelligence firm.

Some of the rumors began after a contractor in Luzerne County mistakenly dropped a small number of military votes. U.S. President Donald Trump used the story to call it evidence of voter fraud. “Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker tried unsuccessfully to defend postal ballots in a situation of fraud everywhere.” He tweeted. “Just look at some of the recent campaigns, or Pennsylvania being thrown in the trash in support of Trump’s vote.”