How does water turn into ice? Scientists have discovered the new structure of the most xiaobing cubes

On November 2, the reporter learned from Dalian Chemical Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences that the team of Jiangling researchers and Yang Xueming academicians, in cooperation with the research group of Professor Li Wei of Tsinghua University, discovered a number of new structures of the most xiaobing cubes using the self-developed neutral cluster infrared spectroscopy experimental method based on Dalian co-relevant light sources, which are composed of eight water molecules, which provides new ideas for uncovering the microstructure and formation mechanism of ice. The results were published recently in Nature Communications.

How does water turn into ice? Scientists have discovered the new structure of the most xiaobing cubes

Ice is common in our life. However, because the crystallization process of ice is very fast and difficult to control, the precise analysis of micro-ice structure and formation mechanism is still a huge scientific problem. It is very important to understand the microstructure and formation mechanism of ice to study how water molecules grow into water molecular clusters, liquid water and ice step by step.

Jiang Ling and Yang Xueming’s team used the self-developed neutral cluster infrared spectral experimental device to find in the study that the infrared spectrum of neutral water molecule octomer (H2O)8 shows the spectral characteristics of ice. In addition, using the self-edited TGMin program combined with high-precision quantum chemistry theory, Li Wei’s research group calculated various stable structures and infrared spectra of water molecule octagons, and the theoretical results are highly consistent with the experimental results, indicating that these most xiaobing cubes are water clusters composed of 8 water molecules.

The results show that there are five stable cube structures in the water molecule octomer, three of which were observed experimentally for the first time. The water molecules in these cube structures are combined at the top corner of the cube in a three-position manner, and the excellent stability of these special structures stems from the action of a large number of off-domain three-center two-electron hydrogen bonds.

This study reveals several new structures of the most xiaobing cubes, which provide new ideas for uncovering the microstructure and formation mechanism of ice, especially “frozen”, and is of great scientific significance for research in the fields of atmospheric science and water science.