Data show that more than 61,000 children in the United States were infected with COVID-19 last week, a new record

According tomedia BGR, the latest update to the new crown outbreak shows the extent of the virus’s impact on children across the United States, revealing a worrying trend. More than 61,000 children were diagnosed with COVID-19 last week — more than in any other week during the pandemic, according to the latest data from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association. Earlier, experts warned that the United States in the coming weeks will usher in the worst of the new crown epidemic.

Data show that more than 61,000 children in the United States were infected with COVID-19 last week, a new record

Public health experts such as Dr. Anthony Folch, the White House health adviser, are increasingly pessimistic about predictions of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Folch shared the following updates with The Washington Post on the outlook for the U.S. winter outbreak on Friday. “We’re hurting as a whole, and that’s not a good situation. When you enter the autumn/winter festival, all the stars are in the wrong place and people gather in their homes indoors. Your situation can’t be any worse. “

More than 61,000 children were diagnosed with COVID-19 last week, according to a report released Monday by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Children’s Hospital Association (CHA). That’s more than any other week of the pandemic so far.

“Although children account for only 11.1 per cent of all cases in states with age-based cases,” the report concludes, “more than 853,000 children have tested positive for COVID-19 since the outbreak began.” That’s now more than 11 percent, after hovering around 2 percent in April.

“This is a stark reminder of the impact of the epidemic on everyone– including our children and adolescents,” Dr. Sally Goza, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said in a press release about the findings. “The virus is highly contagious, and when we see spikes in many communities, children are more likely to be infected. We can help protect everyone in our community by keeping physical distance, wearing masks, and following other advice from doctors and public health professionals. “

While new cases of severe coronary disease have been shown to be rare in children, AAP is urging more data to be collected to study the long-term effects of the virus on children, such as the impact of epidemics and their consequences on mental health. Every week, AAP and CHA aggregate data from public health departments across the United States.

“Not only do children feel the direct effects of the virus and get sick, but at critical stages of development and education, the epidemic has changed their lives,” Dr. Goza said. “I am very concerned about the long-term harm that children may suffer, especially black and Hispanic children, who have higher rates of infection.”