NASA and the California Institute of Technology have discovered the source of a rapid radio burst in the Milky Way

Something exciting happened on April 28 this year, when a strong x-ray burst occurred in our galaxy. It is usually very difficult to find the source of x-ray radio bursts in the universe. In fact, this time an x-ray burst occurred in the Milky Way, making it easier for scientists at NASA and the California Institute of Technology to find the source. The researchers were able to determine that the source was a supermagnetic star debris called a magnetic star.

The discovery proves that magnet stars can produce mysterious and powerful rapid radio bursts (FRBs), a phenomenon previously found in other galaxies. Prior to this event, various scenarios were used to explain the origin of FRB. Chris Bochenek, a doctoral student at the California Institute of Technology who led a study of the event, said the future FRBs story could be twists and turns, but he believes it’s fair to say that most rapid radio bursts come from magnet stars until there’s any other evidence.

A magnet is a neutre star that is broken up by the remains of a star many times between the mass and the sun, roughly the size of a city. They produce a magnetic field 10 trillion times stronger than a refrigerator magnet and thousands of times stronger than a typical neutrometer. The simultaneous burst of X-rays was detected by several satellites, including NASA-related missions. The radio portion of the FRB was discovered by the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), a radio telescope in British Columbia. Radio bursts have also been detected by a NASA-funded project called Transient Astronomical Radio Radiation 2 (STARE2). Interstellar 2 also detected radio pulses.

Several researchers in the project were able to determine that the energy of the explosion was comparable to that of the FRB. The magnetic star that is believed to have occurred in FRB is called sgr1935 plus 2154 and is located in the constellation Vulpecula. Each x-ray burst lasts less than a second, and the storm that produces them rages for hours.

NASA and the California Institute of Technology have discovered the source of a rapid radio burst in the Milky Way