This shiny, smooth Martian rock looks like a pancake with no control over its shape

According tomedia reports, the Mars rover Curiosity took several photos of smooth, shiny rocks on November 3. The larger pieces look like pancakes with no control over their shape, but one thing to keep in mind is that these close-up images tend to make the pebbles look bigger than they actually are.

This shiny, smooth Martian rock looks like a pancake with no control over its shape

Recently, scientists shared and discussed some of curiosity-shaped rocks observed by Curiosity on Twitter. Planetary scientist Emily Lakdawalla retweeted a photo of a shiny rock with an adorable hymn describing how it was “flattened by sand.”

This shiny, smooth Martian rock looks like a pancake with no control over its shape

The stone — which one observer said looked like melted chocolate ice cream — may have been a “wind prism” polished by wind and sand. Mars is never short of wind and sand.

Citizen scientist Kevin Gill has uploaded a number of spectacular selfies of the Curiosity probe, this time posting pictures on Twitter of a group of small rocks, one of which interestingly looks like a Philips electric drill bit, thanks to its way of reflecting light.

This shiny, smooth Martian rock looks like a pancake with no control over its shape

“It’s great that Curiosity Mars found the Philips drill I lost a few months ago, ” Gill quipped. This photo, taken by Curiosity on October 30, was taken by a close-up ChemCam device.

This shiny, smooth Martian rock looks like a pancake with no control over its shape

Curiosity is investigating a “junk zone,” the curiosity probe said in a blog post Wednesday. Lucy Thompson, a planetary geologist at the University of New Brunswick, said his team’s main focus was to document the structure, interrelations and chemical composition of the rocks they encountered.

I believe you should see more images of Mars soon. NASA’s Perseverance is halfway there and will land on Mars in February 2021. At that time, it will settle in another part of Mars, and I’m sure it will find some interesting rocks for everyone to enjoy and study.