No more tooth pulling: New research may find a cure for old cat tooth disease

If your old cat’s teeth are on the road to tooth bone absorption (TR), the only viable treatment is tooth pull,media reported. If your cat shows signs of TR, your cat’s veterinary specialist will almost certainly advise them to remove the affected teeth before TR goes too far.

No more tooth pulling: New research may find a cure for old cat tooth disease

A study published this week sequenced the teeth of a group of cats and extracted RNA to show changes in the transcriptional group of cat TR. The scientists involved in the study wanted to learn more about cat TR in order to eradicate the disease before they needed to pull out their teeth.

TR has been reported to be found in several animals — humans are also included. Horses, dogs, cats and wild cats all have TR symptoms, and as the latest study points out, the disease is most common in older cats.

The researchers began sequencing RNA extracted from 14 teeth from 11 cats. Seven of the teeth had signs of dental disease, while seven did not. By comparing the RNA sequences of these sequences, the researchers found a staggering 1,732 differential expression genes.

No more tooth pulling: New research may find a cure for old cat tooth disease

Of these 1,732 genes, many exhibit bone-breaking cell activity and differentiation, especially the substring metal protease 9 (MMP9). In this study, the expression of MMP9 was determined by testing dental essential cells located in TR lesions by qPCR and immunocellular chemistry.

After determining the expression of MMP9, the researchers used two potential fixes. One is MMP9 siRNA, also known as small interfering RNA, which is specifically designed to affect the molecular sequence of another sequence. In this case, the researchers created a siRNA to combat or eradicate the effects of MMP9. Although the siRNA solution inhibits the differentiation of bone-breaking cells, it seems to have little effect on re-absorption activity.

No more tooth pulling: New research may find a cure for old cat tooth disease

The other is an MMP9 inhibitor 肟 isohydroxyclic acid, which reduces bone-breaking cell formation and re-absorption activity. Although more tests are needed before any direct application/treatment can be created and distributed, the results appear to be positive.

According to research published this week, these results suggest that increased expression of MMP9 is involved in the pathogenesis of TR, which may be a potential therapeutic target for cats with TR.