The U.S. Army plans to expand its list of cloud service providers to include Microsoft Azure

The U.S. Army’s Office of Enterprise Cloud Management (ECMO) has released an information request to find partners to “expand its multi-cloud environment.” The point is that the Army wants to diversify away from Amazon’s cloud services and experiment more with Microsoft Azure products. In particular, cloud partners are available to implement Microsoft cloud services at Impact Level 6 (the highest classification level), which can only be used at Impact Level 5, the second highest level of data security.

The winning contractor will be responsible for deploying the Impact Level 6 Microsoft Cloud Service , which is equivalent to cArmy’s Amazon products and ensures seamless integration between the two.

The U.S. Army plans to expand its list of cloud service providers to include Microsoft Azure

According to RFI’s goal statement, the Army’s ability to master cloud computing will be a “key driver” in its quest for information superiority on the battlefields of the 21st century. The Selected Suppliers of the Army will operate, maintain and enhance the cArmy environment during the five-year implementation period of the contract. Suppliers will also provide project management, customer on-the-job, training, monitoring of service level agreements, customer support and help desk services. Potential bidders have until November 20 to respond and submit a six-page capability statement describing their skills and experience in using Microsoft and Amazon cloud services in a highly regulated environment.

The Army’s enterprise cloud contracts are joined by a growing number of large-scale multi-cloud management contracts, most of which are for a single vendor.

The U.S. Army plans to expand its list of cloud service providers to include Microsoft Azure

Earlier, the Pentagon confirmed it would maintain a “JEDI” cloud computing contract with Microsoft, which has been disputed in court for months. Microsoft signed a 10-year, $10 billion contract with the Pentagon last October for the Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) cloud computing contract. In November, Amazon Web Services, Amazon’s cloud computing division, filed a lawsuit in the U.S. Federal Claims Court against the JEDI contract ruling, accusing U.S. President Donald Trump of exerting “inappropriate pressure” and bias that led Amazon to miss the contract.