Shipping dates show that the sea blue iPhone 12 Pro series appears to be Apple’s most popular model this year

A review of the iPhone’s pre-order shipping dates on Friday showed that the iPhone 12 Pro/Pro Max appears to be Apple’s most popular model in 2020, according to Loup Ventures, according tomedia agency Apple Insider. In a brief note released Friday, Gene Munster and David Stokman asserted that the shipping dates for the iPhone 12 mini and iPhone 12 Pro Max “basically reflect” the popularity of the two 2020 iPhone models released in October.

Shipping dates show that the sea blue iPhone 12 Pro series appears to be Apple's most popular model this year

“Importantly, given that the supply of the two latest iPhones is likely to be larger than the supply of the two iPhones that began booking on October 16, we do not expect to see a change in shipping dates this morning,” the two wrote.

However, the delivery dates for the iPhone 12 Pro Max and iPhone 12 mini began to change shortly after bookings began at 5 a.m. Pacific time (8 a.m. Eastern time) on November 6. The larger 6.7-inch models have delivery times of about 7 to 17 days, depending on color, storage capacity and carrier. As of Friday morning, the iPhone 12 mini always shows all sizes and models on November 13 with the original delivery date.

This basically reflects what happened when the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro were pre-ordered three weeks ago. Depending on the variant, the iPhone 12 Pro will take delivery from 7 to 10 days to 1 to 2 weeks. The iPhone 12’s delivery time remains at the original October 23 delivery date.

Munster and Stokman suggest that so far, the sea blue/128GB storage iPhone 12 Pro and the iPhone 12 Pro Max are among Apple’s two most popular models.

According to early data, Loup Ventures maintained its forecast for a 15 percent increase in iPhone revenue in 2021 and still simulates the average price of an Apple product line in 2020 at $818.

Loup Ventures cautions that linking shipping dates to demand is “more about art than science” and that Apple watchers still don’t know what’s actually going on with the iPhone. Still, Munster and Stokman point out that extended lead times have traditionally been a good indicator of demand.