Astronomers have discovered a repeat of a rapid radio storm in the Milky Way

A radio energy explosion known as a rapid radio storm (FRB) has been detected and repeated in the Milky Way,media BGR reported. Rapid radio bursts are thought to be caused by magnetic stars, a star with a strong magnetic field that self-breaks and collapses, producing powerful energy explosions that radiate through space. The FRB detected by astronomers in the Milky Way has been traced to a specific magnetic star.

Astronomers have discovered a repeat of a rapid radio storm in the Milky Way

Although most rapid radio bursts are one-off events, an object in the Milky Way appears to have produced multiple eruptions in a relatively short period of time. As scientists explain in a new paper published in Nature-Astronomy, this rapid radio storm appears to originate from an object called a magneto-star. More specifically, the magnet star SGR 1935-2154 appears to be making “noise”, and studies of the location and the eruptions from it help support the hypothesis that the magnetost is indeed the cause of some of the rapid radio bursts detected by radio telescopes on Earth.

Astronomers have discovered a repeat of a rapid radio storm in the Milky Way

“The recent detection by CHIME/FRB and STAR2 of a very bright radio storm from the Milky Way magnet SGR 1935-2154 supports the hypothesis that (at least some) rapid radio storms are emitted by magnet stars at cosmological distances,” the researchers wrote. “In a total of 522.7 hours of follow-up observation of the source, we detected two bright radio storms with a total of 112±22Jy ms and 24±5Jy ms, respectively. Both bursts appear to be affected by interstellar scattering, and we have measured significant linear and circular polarization in darker outbreaks. The eruption was about 1.4 seconds apart in time. “

Most of the rapid radio storms detected by astronomers come from outside the Milky Way, making them difficult to identify. Rapid radio storms appear in the Milky Way, making it easier to track their origins, and while other galactic phenomena may also produce these powerful radio signals, it seems that astronomers have identified at least one source.