Epic’s CEO likened the company’s battle with Apple’s App Store to the civil rights movement

Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney said a 30 percent fee for working with Apple was like “colluding to limit competition,” according tomedia reports. Sweeney is understood to have made the comparison in an interview with the Wall Street Journal at the Dearbook summit.

Epic's CEO likened the company's battle with Apple's App Store to the civil rights movement

But on Wednesday, local time, Apple announced that it would reduce the commissions that App Store developers pay.

Many independent developers congratulated the news, saying it was a lengthy process that would enhance their ability to work as full-time developers. But big companies don’t feel the joy, and Epic’s CEO is one of the most prominent voices of opposition.

“It’s everyone’s responsibility to fight. It’s not just a choice made by someone’s lawyer, it’s our responsibility to fight,” Sweeney said. “

Epic Games is understood to have launched a lawsuit to sue Apple and push the company to open up third-party stores and payment platforms. Sweeney and Epic then hinted that they were fighting for the little guys, as well as trying to help small developers who couldn’t compete with Apple.

To reinforce his position, Sweeney assured TechCrunch readers that what he had said at the event was accurate. In responses and follow-up tweets, he again emphasized that statement.

Epic's CEO likened the company's battle with Apple's App Store to the civil rights movement

Epic's CEO likened the company's battle with Apple's App Store to the civil rights movement

Sweeney went on to point out that it was not even about the commission, it was about fairness.

Epic Games has now formed a coalition of developers and companies, including anti-Apple supporters such as Spotify. In addition, Epic has launched a new lawsuit in Australia, hoping to establish a legal precedent to gain a foothold.