Studies have found that bullet-replaceable e-cigarettes reduce harm to smokers

When it comes to reducing the risks of nicotine addiction, a new study by Brown University has found that bullet-replaceable e-cigarettes may do less harm to smokers. The study involved current cigarette smokers, some of whom were tasked with replacing their regular tobacco cigarettes with e-cigarettes.

Studies have found that bullet-replaceable e-cigarettes reduce harm to smokers

E-cigarettes have become a popular alternative to nicotine. These devices are increasingly in the form of “bullet-changing”, using small refillable smoke bombs with a closed heating element and wick. These devices are used with liquid solutions containing nicotine.

While public experts caution that e-cigarettes are unhealthy, the evidence does suggest that they are less harmful than tobacco cigarettes, which expose smokers to carbon monoxide, tar and a variety of chemicals that contribute to their addiction.

The new study involved 186 participants, all smokers. Participants were divided into two groups; two-thirds were given e-cigarettes and used for six weeks, while the rest continued to use their regular tobacco cigarettes.

Six weeks later, participants were assessed and found that NNAL levels were “significantly lower” among those given e-cigarettes, a very dangerous lung carcinogen. In addition, e-cigarette users were described as having “significantly” lower levels of carbon monoxide, and they reported improved respiratory symptoms.