The brief and unique properties of a black hole: “Rapid baldness after long hair”

BEIJING, Nov. 29 (Xinhua) — Because black holes devour everything around them, even light, black holes do not reveal important clues about their origin or history, and in the 1960s, scientists declared that “black holes are hairless”, meaning that there are no specific features between them, according to the U.S. Life Science website.

Current lying, new calculations suggest that some black holes can “grow hair” but not for long. According to the latest study, black holes close to the maximum rotation altogether show some unique properties, but they didn’t last long, eventually making black holes “bare” and difficult to distinguish from other black holes of their kind.

The hairless metaphor for black holes was proposed by physicists Jacob Bekenstein and John Wheeler in the 1960s and early 1970s, who argued that after the formation of black holes, only three conservations that could not be turned into electromagnetic radiation – mass, mass, Angular momentum and charge, all other information (like “hairs”) are tied to the gravity of a black hole, and scientists cannot observe that black holes have few complex properties of formation, and have no memory of the shape and composition of the material of their predecessors, assuming that the two black holes match on three conservation stakes, making it functionally impossible to distinguish them.

Current lying, new calculations suggest that some black holes can “grow hair” but not for long. According to the latest study, black holes close to the maximum rotation altogether show some unique properties, but they didn’t last long, eventually making black holes “bare” and difficult to distinguish from other black holes of their kind.

This is an interesting finding that confirms a brief behavioral phenomenon.

For years, scientists have been looking for things that can distinguish black holes from each other, and if they can discover some features, they can solve the mystery of their origin. For example, while many black holes are thought to be remnants of stellar collapse, some are thought to have formed shortly after the Big Bang, when the universe was formed by an unusually dense region of the early universe. If two black holes have the same mass, angular momentum and charge, it is difficult to distinguish the original black hole from the star black hole.

In 2018, A team of researchers led by physicist Dejan Gajic of the University of Cambridge in the UK found that extreme black holes with highly likely charges have unique properties that can be distinguished from other black holes. These properties relate to measurable changes in the black hole horizon (the point where gravity is so powerful that light cannot escape) and the Coxie horizon (the point at which past and future causal itys are broken due to the time-distorting effect of strong gravitational field).

Bourke and colleagues are interested in the unique properties of black holes, which are usually formed under extreme conditions, but not entirely so. They simulated two types of black holes, the first being near the extreme Resna-Nordstrom black hole, which has a charge close to the maximum but not rotating, and a close-to-extreme Kerr black hole, a black hole that runs almost at maximum spin speed but does not have an electric charge.

In two near-extreme black holes, researchers have found evidence of “hair” but the evidence is temporary, they said in a study published November 15 in the journal Physical Review Research, which found that when a simulated black hole first formed, the unique properties of an extreme black hole could be measured, but over time , it decreases in a secondary function of time, meaning that the value shrinks rapidly from the beginning and then continues to decline at a slower rate over time. Researchers have not yet calculated how quickly this process will occur in real time, depending on the mass, angular momentum and charge of the established black hole.

Although these simulations are currently theoretical speculations, the actual observations match and contradict expectations, and the Laser Interference Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) experiment is actively measuring gravitational waves, which are the gravitational ripples of large cosmic objects such as neutron stars and black holes.

The Laser Interferometry Space Antenna (LISA) is an upcoming astronomical project that will launch three spacecraft to detect gravitational waves in space, designed to detect gravitational waves from supermassive black holes, and it is not yet known how long such experiments will take to capture a near-limiting black hole, but if such a black hole emerges, Gravitational waves may also have unique properties. (Ye Ding Cheng)

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