World Meteorological Organization statement says the world has been hit hard by climate disasters this year

Recently, during the 25th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Climate Change Conference, the World Meteorological Organization issued an interim statement on the state of the world’s climate in 2019, according to the World Meteorological Organization data, according to the World Meteorological Organization as a node, the past decade, the world’s abnormal high temperatures, glacier melting and sea level rise have reached record levels.

2016 remained the hottest year on record due to an unusually strong El Nino. 2019 will be the second or third warmest year on record, and the world will once again be hit hard by weather and climate-related disasters.

World Meteorological Organization statement says the world has been hit hard by climate disasters this year

Since the 1980s, temperatures have been higher than in the previous decade, the statement said. The average global temperature from January to October 2019 is about 1.1 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial. Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide reached a record 407.8 ppm in 2018 and continue to rise in 2019.

In 2019, a once-in-a-century heat wave and floods are becoming more frequent, with many countries from the Bahamas to Japan to Mozambique hit by devastating tropical cyclones. Wildfires have swept across the Arctic and Australia. One of the main impacts of climate change is more volatile rainfall patterns, which pose a threat to crop yields and, combined with population growth, pose serious food security challenges for fragile countries in the future.

World Meteorological Organization statement says the world has been hit hard by climate disasters this year

The statement highlighted the impact of weather and climate change on human health, food security, migration, ecosystems and marine life. Extreme heat swells and health systems are increasingly affecting human health and health systems, including population ageing, urbanization, urban heat island effects and health inequalities. Climate change and extreme weather events are among the key drivers of rising global hunger and the food crisis. After a decade of steady decline, the number of hungry people worldwide rose again in 2018, with more than 820 million people suffering from hunger.

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