More and more doctors are learning surgical skills on YouTube

More and more doctors are learning surgical skills on YouTube

With 2 billion unique users each month and 500 hours of movies uploaded per minute, YouTube is no longer the world’s largest video sharing platform. There are a number of movies on YouTube that contain surgical methods, and doctors around the world are learning from YouTube about surgical techniques and how to handle new medical devices, CNBC reports, an overseas news media outlet.

 Dr. Justin Ballad, who completed his surgical training in 2015 at the University of California, Los Angeles, has trouble that he has never experienced before. It is said that it is now necessary to use a new device without sufficient training, so it is said that it is possible to do the preparation by watching the movie published on YouTube. According to Dr. Ballad, There were many movies on YouTube explaining difficult surgeries and rare cases, and he sometimes referred to YouTube in the operating room.

According to CNBC, some doctors have published their operations on YouTube as reference material for doctors and used them to find a job to prove their skills. In October 2019, a team of doctors working at Austin Hospital in Australia posted only about 500 surgical movies in 2009. In 2019, the company announced that more than 20,000 films have been posted on prostate surgery alone. In 2016, the University of Iowa conducted a survey of medical students and doctors, and about 86 percent of respondents said they had used YouTube for surgical training materials.

More and more doctors are learning surgical skills on YouTube

    In addition, some of the tens of thousands of surgical movies are more than a million times popular. For example, a movie of cataract surgery at Wills Eye Hospital in Pennsylvania, USA, recorded more than 1.8 million views at the time of writing. “Distributing surgical video materials” is inherently expensive, but using a large online platform like YouTube, you can publish video materials at a low cost. However, On the other hand, YouTube itself is not a medical platform, and the content is not scrutinized, and the content is displayed based on popularity rather than quality. Dr. Oliver Alami, a vascular surgeon at Stanford Hospital, revealed that he was using YouTube, but said, “Certainly the surgical movies on YouTube are useful, but I think some of them should be verified.”

   In a study published in 2017, more than 68,000 videos of surgery for tibia distal fractures have been uploaded to YouTube, but researchers evaluated them on a technical and educational perspective. It has been reported that only 16 video materials that met the basic criteria were found. In addition, there was a movie in which the operator’s credentials were unknown. Doctors at Austin Hospital also pointed out that the movie displayed by The YouTube search algorithm is never determined by the doctor’s technique. For example, about half of the movies about laparoscopic surgery for cholecystectomy lacked consideration for safety.

More and more doctors are learning surgical skills on YouTube

The situation in which by Ethan Trewhitt YouTube is used worldwide as a medical resource library seems to be recognized by Google, which runs YouTube. David Feinberg, Vice President of Google’s Health Department, pointed out that at an event in November 2019, many surgeons are focusing on YouTube. Mr. Feinberg also said he would like to better manage content as part of fighting fake news about healthcare across Google.

Some healthprofessionals have expressed their willingness to work with YouTube to help them scrutinize digital content for healthcare. Stephen Klasco, chief executive of Jefferson Health, one of them, said, “In the long run, YouTube should push better medical content, such as surgery, over other video content.” The future that Google should welcome is to be an official partner in society.”

More and more doctors are learning surgical skills on YouTube

By Vancouver Coastal Health also said, “We recognize that technology will transform healthcare, but does a professor in medicine really understand programming and social media at the same level as students? Mr. Krasco raised questions, pointing out that many medical educational institutions have been in the same way as they have always been, and have not been able to adapt to the digital age.

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