U.S. Department of Homeland Security announces withdrawal of airport facial recognition scanning program for U.S. citizens

According tomedia reports, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has confirmed that no more U.S. citizens entering and leaving the U.S. to carry out mandatory face recognition scans. A few days ago, the department proposed that U.S. citizens entering and leaving the country must also undergo face-to-face scans. In response, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) publicly condemned the rule as a serious privacy concern.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security announces withdrawal of airport facial recognition scanning program for U.S. citizens

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Currently, U.S. citizens can choose not to undergo facial recognition scans at airports, but foreign nationals and visitors must accept them upon arrival or departure from the United States. The Department of Homeland Security said the move was aimed at helping combat illegal immigration and visa detention.

A spokesman for U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) said the agency has no current plans to require U.S. citizens to provide photos when entering or leaving the U.S.

A spokesman for the agency said they initially intended to get U.S. citizens to undergo facial recognition scanning procedures, but after consulting with Congress and privacy experts, they decided to continue the voluntary approach.

Privacy advocates have warned the government not to expand face-recognition scans for U.S. citizens because of privacy risks, a source familiar with the meeting said.

Jay Stanley, senior policy analyst at the ACLU, said: “This proposal should not have been released, and it is positive that the government is withdrawing it after growing public and legislative opposition… (But) the government should not be trusted to use this surveillance technology, and Congress should hit the brakes. “

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