Astronomers discover the largest black hole in the near-Earth universe 700 million light-years from Earth

Astronomers at the Max Planck Institute of Extraterrestrial Physics and the University of Munich Observatory have discovered the largest known black hole in the near-earth universe through direct mass measurements,media reported. The black hole, 700 million light-years from Earth, is located in the Abell 85 cluster in the cetus constellation and is 40 billion times the mass of the sun.

Astronomers discover the largest black hole in the near-Earth universe 700 million light-years from Earth

Since the first black holes were confirmed in 1971, they have become the main subject sq., a major study in astrophysics. Theoretically, the smallest black hole is 22 micrograms, but at the other end of the balance, the Max Planck team, led by the Ralf Bender team, found that the mass of the newly discovered black hole was greater than the sum of the mass of the Magellan Nebula.

Based on the luminosity data and spectra recorded by the Very Large Telescope, the team found that the supermassive black hole is located at the center of Holm 15A, the central galaxy of the Abell 85 cluster of 500 independent galaxies. Holm 15A itself is not lightweight. However, the center area of Holm 15A is very scattered and faint because it is about 15,000 light-years in diameter, leading the team to suspect the possibility of a supermassive black hole. It also provides a rare opportunity to measure the mass of a black hole directly by tracking the motion of stars and gases near it.

Astronomers discover the largest black hole in the near-Earth universe 700 million light-years from Earth

The team found that Holm 15A has a very flat light curve at its center, suggesting that the region’s stars were driven away by an event – most likely a “core scouring”, which occurs when two galaxies with black holes in their centermerge merge. As the central black hole gathers together, nearby stars pop up, leaving not enough gas to form new stars.

Jens Thomas, who provides the dynamics model, said: “The latest generation of galaxy merger computer simulations provides us with predictions that really match the observed characteristics. These simulations include interactions between stars and black holes, but the key component is two elliptical galaxies that have exhausted their cores. This means that the shape of the light profile and the trajectory of the star contain valuable information about the core formation of this galaxy and other very large galaxies. “

The team hopes that by studying the structure of Holm 15A, it is possible to estimate the mass of the core black holes of distant galaxies that cannot be directly measured in the future.

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