Zeolite foam developed by Swedish scientists could be used for better carbon capture filters

To reduce greenhouse gas emissions and collect useful by-products, scientists are increasingly studying ways to capture carbon dioxide emissions from industrial chimneys. New filtration materials may be easier and more efficient than ever before. The solid foam-like substance was developed by the Swedish University of Technology in Chalmes and Stockholm University and is made up of tiny zeolite particles combined with gelatin and cellulose.

Zeolite foam developed by Swedish scientists could be used for better carbon capture filters

Zeolite is a mineral of aluminum silicate. Because zeolite is very porous, they are excellent at absorbing carbon dioxide. It has been reported that the traditional production and implementation of zeolite particles are difficult to use, limiting their availability.

The new foam is said to solve the problem, starting with the use of much smaller particles than usual, thus increasing the total surface area of zeolite. Second, since these particles are suspended in three dimensions in the foam matrix, carbon dioxide is easier to pass through chimney filters made of open porous foam.

Zeolite foam developed by Swedish scientists could be used for better carbon capture filters

The proportion of zeolite in this material is as high as 90%, which is not only considered to be very effective in absorbing carbon dioxide, but also consists of environmentally friendly materials. In addition, it is reported to be lightweight, inexpensive, durable and can be reused several times after removing captured carbon dioxide to convert into a product, such as calcium carbonate.

“What surprised us most was that the foam could be filled with such a high proportion of zeolite,” said Walter Rosas Arbelaez, a doctoral student at Chalmers University of Technology. “We think our results are a very interesting challenge, and it is looking for solutions to the complex challenge of rapidly reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere to meet climate goals. “

The paper on the study, led by Professor Anders Palmqvist of Chalmers University of Technology, was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

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