Fresh protective clothing simulates shark skin to better protect soldiers

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency says it wants less bulky protective clothing that better protects soldiers, first responders and researchers from deadly biological and chemical weapons. The existing biochemical combat suits are both bulky and bulky, according to a December 6 report on the website of the monthly public machinery. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency wants the new protective clothing to have two features.

One is that the garment prevents direct contact between the wearer and the tiny harmful substances, forming some kind of physical barrier. The second is that this protective suit eliminates the toxicity of harmful substances that penetrate the barrier to the skin, eyes, mouth and nose. This protective suit should be able to defuse at least two chemical or biological threats at the same time.

Fresh protective clothing simulates shark skin to better protect soldiers

Fresh protective clothing simulates shark skin to better protect soldiers

The Defense Department’s Advanced Research Projects Bureau says the technology could be inspired in part by nature. “By simulating shark skin structures on different types of materials, the inherent anti-fouling capabilities of shark skin can be utilized for antibacterial properties,” the agency explained. In addition, existing bacterial communities living in the human body are able to perceive and respond to environmental bacteria and fungi. “

According to the tender announcement, this protective suit should be able to protect against a wide variety of chemical and biological threats. In terms of chemical threats, it should protect users from harmful substances such as chlorine, ammonia, gas, mustard gas and organophosphate poisons such as GB and VX. Bacterial protection will be extended to anthrax and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and virus protection should stop influenza, rhinoviruses and viruses such as the Ebola virus that cause haemorrhagic fever. Finally, it should provide protection against chemical terrorist attacks such as ricin toxin, Botox poisoning and synthetic opioids.

The business community’s bid is required to be submitted in early 2020, after which the Defense Department’s Advanced Research Projects Bureau will work with the winning bidder to develop a body-worn technical demonstration suit by 2025.

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