Tribute to Windows Mobile: It’s not to blame Apple for being a ‘slow follower’

After receiving the last cumulative update, the Windows 10 Mobile system officially withdrew from the historical arena. This means that this mobile operating system will not receive any security and feature updates in the future. While users will still be able to continue using Windows 10 Mobile, major apps, including WhatsApp, will stop working in a few weeks. Today,media MSPowerUser released Windows Mobile Eulogy: Apple is not a smartphone inventor, remembering the “world’s third-largest mobile phone system” that had been expected to be highly anticipated.

Original: Apple did not invent the smartphone: A Eulogy for Windows phones

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

‘Some might think that the death of Windows Mobile dates back to the release of the iPhone in 2007, which redefined smartphones,’ he wrote. But Surur, the foreign editor, doesn’t think so.

Surur has been using the operating system since Microsoft first launched pocket PC PDA in 1999. His first Windows Mobile phone was the XDA II, a phone with the same 3.5-inch screen as the first iPhone, and has many similarities in design.

It is for this reason that Surur wrote this article to remind readers that, despite Steve Job’s excellent presentation skills, Apple has not invented touch-screen smartphones, and that they have been relatively late to join the industry.

Apple hasn’t invented the App Store either, but offers a wealth of software (somewhat similar to Android today). Apple hasn’t invented apps or smartphone browsers either (though it’s clear that they’re close to perfecting it).

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Currently, Windows Mobile phones use a stylus (or nail) on a slow resistance screen, but they’re already rich in design, form and size, from a 7-inch oversized screen to a 2.8-inch flip phone, from QVGA to 720P, plus a flip screen and a folded body.

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Windows Mobile is designed around enterprise productivity, and choosing a shortcut button does give you faster access to commonly used applications. Windows Mobile is designed to take advantage of the user’s familiarity with the Windows operating system by accessing the application faster on any screen by starting the menu without having to return to the home screen before proceeding.

Windows Mobile is designed for advanced users and may always be the only mobile operating system with a registry editor. The operating system can be used in any situation, and its powerful scalability can also be used as a barcode scanner in some industrial environments. Windows Mobile was widely used by OEMs and even end users at the time, so it was really very personal.

Some of Windows Mobile’s system features are still being replicated on contemporary information-intensive screens, especially touch screens. And iOS and Android plug-ins are still very bad replacements today, decades later.

Tribute to Windows Mobile: It's not to blame Apple for being a 'slow follower'

Unlike the iPhone, Windows Mobile has real depth and is free to scale by end users, just like android. End users can change browsers, default applications, and even shells to suit their needs.

For more than that, Surur has been enjoying Windows Mobile for years. If you have to use a word or two to explain exactly what’s wrong with Windows Mobile, I think it’s “Microsoft is always a slow follower.”

In the fast-changing smartphone space, that means BlackBerry is chasing Nokia in the rise, followed by the rise of the iPhone chasing the BlackBerry, and now android’s rise chasing the iPhone. This leads to products always falling behind market demand by a year or two. This may be the result of a culture of Microsoft, which means that Microsoft does not have the guts to deploy ideas that have not yet been proven in the marketplace. (The best case is Courier)

Surur is sure that one day there will be books on how Microsoft missed out on the mobile market, so he will buy it.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *