Marine plastic or millions more than estimated: entering the human body through the food chain

Recently, according tomedia reports, the National Science Foundation released a study that said that plastic fragments in the ocean may be more than most than previously estimated. Traditional ocean microplastic measurements can only measure plastic sheets larger than 333 microns in diameter, the report said, and the study found that microplastics can be as small as 10 microns in diameter.

Marine plastic or millions more than estimated: entering the human body through the food chain

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The researchers estimate that the average cubic meter of seawater contains up to 8.3 million pieces of microplastic. Previously, only larger plastics were monitored, with only 10 tablets per cubic meter, and the number of measurements would be 5 to 7 orders of magnitude less than the actual number of orders of magnitude.

The researchers monitored microplastics in the body of the sea otters (small glial invertebrates) and found that all 100 samples contained microplastics in the intestines of the sea otters.

The digestion and excretion of the sea otters causes microplastics to gather on the sea floor and enter the bottom of the marine chain. Microplastics travel up the food chain and may eventually enter the body through marine food.

A previous study by the Medical University of Vienna in Austria showed that the subjects they invited contained 20 microplastics (plastics in size 50 to 500 microns) in every 10 grams of faeces, so it was assumed that about 73,000 microplastics were eaten per person per year.

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