Stanford University new study: People who drink redness are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease

A new study published in the Journal of Neuropathology by researchers at Stanford University suggests that drinking from red-faced people may increase their risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according tomedia reports. Drinking blush is due to a mutation in a gene called ALDH2 in the body, which is found in about 8 percent of the world’s population, especially in East Asian populations.

The team first examined cells from 20 Alzheimer’s patients, several of whom were from Japan who carried the ALDH2 mutation gene, and the enzyme metabolized acetaldehyde only a quarter of the normal protein.

These enzyme-defective cells produce more free radicals than normal cells, while the toxic aldehydes increase significantly.

To learn more about the relationship between alcohol and ALDH2, the researchers also injected alcohol into mice carrying the ALDH2 mutation gene to simulate the effects of long-term drinking.

After 11 weeks of continuous “drinking”, the genetically modified mice also accumulated fragments of beta amyloid protein and activated tau protein, both of which were important pathological markers of Alzheimer’s disease.

In addition, signs of nerve inflammation increased after aldH2 mutant mice injected with alcohol. Chronic neuroinflammation exacerbates the exacerbation of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Stanford University new study: People who drink redness are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease

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