The study says DC fast charging and cooling solutions are the most important factors affecting THE aging of EV batteries

According to a report released by geotab, the fleet management company, after surveying 6,300 electric vehicles, it is clear that the use of DC fast charging and air conditioning can accelerate the loss and aging of electric vehicle power batteries. Like many moving parts on fuel vehicles, EV-powered batteries are not sustainable. If you often rely on DC fast charging and air conditioning systems, the battery aging will be much faster.

The study says DC fast charging and cooling solutions are the most important factors affecting THE aging of EV batteries

(From: GM Motors, via Cnet)

On average, the annual loss of EV batteries is 2.3%. If an EV car has a nominal range of 150 miles, the five-year loss is about 15 miles.

However, many factors, including the temperature of use, can have an impact on the health of the battery, especially the rapid charging of DC, as well as the manufacturer-designed cooling solution.

For EV owners with mileage anxiety, DC Fast Charge is their preferred charging option. If you connect to 240V (secondary) or 120V (first-level) mains, the car will need to wait for several hours of charging.

The study found that the power battery loss of the EV is almost negligible under the L2 and L1 charging schemes. But as the DC fast charge frequency increases, the decay of the power battery becomes more pronounced.

The study says DC fast charging and cooling solutions are the most important factors affecting THE aging of EV batteries

(From: Geotab)

Studies have shown that this phenomenon may be associated with high currents and high temperatures at fast charging. Both factors are extremely unhealthy for any type of battery.

With this in mind, it’s best to use more L2-class charging than a DC fast charging solution to maximize the life of an EV-powered battery.

Battery heat management, air-cooled and liquid-cooled solutions, there are also great differences. The 2015 Nissan Leaf, for example, uses a passive air cooling mechanism that has a 4.2% battery decay rate a year later.

By contrast, the Tesla Model S, also available in 2015, has a battery decay of just 2.3% — a temperature that can accelerate battery degradation.

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