Canadian University Invents Self-Cleaning Non-Stick Coating: Rejects Viruses and Bacteria

A new study published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Nanoscience and Technology suggests that a self-cleaning surface has been developed that can repel a variety of bacteria. A team at McMaster University has developed a self-cleaning surface that can repel a variety of bacteria, preventing the spread of drug-resistant superbugs and other dangerous bacteria in hospitals, kitchens and other places, the report said.

This could be an ideal material for food packaging, preventing the accidental transfer of bacteria such as E. coli, salmonella and listeria from raw chicken, meat and other foods, the paper says.

This self-cleaning surface can cover door handles, railings, intravenous fluid racks, and other surfaces that may attract bacteria.

The researchers say the idea was inspired by hydrophobic lotus leaves, and the new surface works through a combination of nanoscale surface engineering and chemistry. This surface is slightly wrinkled, and a drop of water or blood pops up when it falls on the surface, as do bacteria.

The researchers chemically treated the surface to further enhance its repulsivity, creating a flexible, durable and inexpensive barrier for production.

The surface has been tested by two of the most resistant bacteria ( Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas). By capturing electron microscope images, it is proved that few bacteria can be transferred.

“Applying this surface to a production table or as a package can solve many of the bacterial contamination problems that are now being addressed,” said Tohid Didar, a McMaster researcher. “

Canadian University Invents Self-Cleaning Non-Stick Coating: Rejects Viruses and Bacteria

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