New probe at EU nuclear center expected to capture neutrinos

Collision opportunities produce a large number of neutrinos, but these neutrinos have never been detected, and that will now change. CERN’s new probe, FASER, was recently approved and will be installed in the front of the experimental main detector, which is expected to detect neutrinos from colliding collisions and usher in a new era in neutrino physics, CERN reported Wednesday.

New probe at EU nuclear center expected to capture neutrinos

FASER Experimental Art Map.  Photo: CERN.com

Since the first observation of neutrinos in nuclear reactors in 1956, scientists have detected neutrinos from many sources, such as the sun, the atmosphere and the Earth, but unfortunately never in the particle collider. Most of the neutrinos in the collider have very high energy, and we know very little about the interaction of high-energy neutrinos, so the neutrinos produced in the collider may be able to bring new insights into neutrino research.

FASER was approved earlier this year to search for light and weakly interacting particles such as dark photons. THE FASER WILL BE LOCATED ABOUT 480 METERS DOWNSTREAM OF THE SUPER-RING INSTRUMENT EXPERIMENT (ATLAS) WITHIN THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER (LHC), WHICH IS IDEAL FOR DETECTING NEUTRINOS, BUT THE MAIN DETECTOR CANNOT DETECT NEUTRINOS.

“Because neutrinos interact with matter very weakly, we need a target that contains a lot of matter to successfully detect them,” explains Jamie Boyd, co-spokesman for the FASER experiment. The FASER main detector does not have such a target to detect neutrinos. FASER is just the one who can ‘make a big difference’. It consists of latex film and tungsten plate and acts as a target and detector to observe the interaction of neutrinos. “

FaSER is 1.35 meters long, 25 cm wide, 25 cm high and weighs 1.2 tons, far less than the current main neutrino detector, Japan’s “Super Shenoka” probe weighs 50,000 tons;

The FASER team estimates that FASER can detect more than 20,000 neutrinos during operation. The average energy of these neutrinos is between 600 geV and 1 teelectron volt (TeV). There are three types of neutrinos: electron neutrinos, neutrinos, and neutrinos. The team expects to detect 1,300, 20,000 and 20 neutrinos, respectively.

“These will be the most energetic artificial neutrinos, and detecting and studying them within the LHC is a milestone in particle physics, enabling researchers to make complementary measurements in the field of neutrino physics,” Boyd said. FASER will also pave the way for future collider neutrino programs, the results of which will inform the construction of larger neutrino detectors. “

It is reported that the LHC is scheduled to restart in May 2021, THE FASER probe will be installed before the restart, and during the LHC operation to collect data.

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