After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

A scientist can be a beauty pageant winner, and Miss America can be a scientist. At the recently concluded Miss USA competition, Camille Schrier, a 24-year-old pharmacy doctoral student from Virginia, took the Miss 2020 crown and used strength to illustrate the new trend of “Brainy is new sexy”.

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

Figures . . . Camille Schrier wins the title (Source: Camille Schrier)

On the “alternative” beauty pageant stage she created, Camille Schrier ditched the traditional beauty pageant series, withno swimwear, no singing or dancing, and instead moved a chemical test stand to the Miss USA final.

Camille Schrier, dressed in full lab gear on stage, wrapped her body tightly and completed a simple and stunning chemistry experiment. In the end, he beat 50 competitors to become the champion, while also taking in $50,000 in event prize money.

Although the experimental principle is not complicated, the use of an “untimely” chemical experiment as a performance project on a stage traditionally pervading fame and interest has made Camille Schrier the most “hard core” champion in the history of the Miss Usa in America for nearly a century.

Hard-core Aesthetics at beauty pageant finals

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

In the broad impression that the beauty contest stage is always full of the smell of fame and fame, the contestants in the spotlight to show their outstanding appearance, unique talent and moving stories.

Singing, dancing and catwalk are the most common items, and everything in the spotlight is often around “beauty”. These performances are often easier to match people’s appreciation of “beauty”.

And Camille Schrier has a broken traditional understanding of beauty. Simple scientific principles created by the colorful, cool scientific phenomenon, she shows of course not only a simple chemical equation and experimental results, originally and artistic far from the chemical experiment, there will be a display of “hard nuclear aesthetics” side.

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

Figures . . . Camille Schrier (Source: NBC)

On stage, Camille Schrier wore a lab white coat, wearing special gloves, goggles, professional equipment and a standard operating procedure. The experiment is actually a “catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide”, often referred to as “elephant toothpaste”.

Simply put, the concentrated hydrogen peroxide solution (generally 30% to 35%) is mixed with soapy water, detergent and other foaming agents, and then added potassium iodide and other catalysts to allow hydrogen peroxide to decompose quickly.

The oxygen released by the reaction rushes out of the container very quickly, then is wrapped in soapy water to produce a large amount of bubbles, and gathers into foam as a volcano erupts.

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

Figures . . . Camille Schrier (Source: Miss America)

With little ingredients required, simple operation, spectacular and safe results, elephant toothpaste is often featured in school classroom presentations and fun videos.

Not only that, but Camille Schrier pre-adds pigment to the solution, creating a bubble that is colorful and looks interesting and spectacular.

In the end, three colored foam columns spewed out on the beauty pageant stage, making Camille Schrier stand out from the crowd. Clearly, the beauty of science impressed the judges and added a lot to Schrier’s victory.

Breaking down the stereotype of “beauty”

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

Camille Schrier, 24, is a standard post-90. When she was 14, she became interested in beauty pageants and made it a dream of her self to compete in the Miss USA contest. When she was in high school, she wrote the idea directly on her profile on the school’s website.

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

Figures . . . Camille Schrier (Source: Instagram)

But for a long time, the idea came true with two obstacles: “I don’t like swimwear competitions, and I’m not a dancer.” Camille Schrier said. This has been an integral part of beauty contests in the past.

Swimwear has hardly been absent since the first Miss USA competition in 1921, and it is almost synonymous with the competition in other beauty contests around the world.

After nearly a century of development, an era that has placed more emphasis on women’s empowerment and gender equality, the Miss USA contest has begun to redefine its role.

Starting in 2018, the organizers of the Miss USA contest announced that contestants would not be wearing swimwear, the first time in the competition’s nearly 100-year history that the event had been canceled.

“We don’t judge you by your appearance,” Gretchen Carlson, the tournament’s president, said at the time. Led by the Miss USA contest, beauty pageants in u.S. states have also been eliminated from the swimwear section, with a greater emphasis on the talent, intelligence and ideas of the contestants.

Instead, the contest gives each contestant 90 seconds of personal stage time to tell them how they will work to make a difference in people’s lives and a better world.

The shift has directly rekindled Camille Schrier’s dream of returning to the stage.

In 2018, she received a degree in biochemistry and systems biology and graduated with honors from Virginia Tech. Immediately after, Camille Schrier went to Virginia Commonwealth University,VCU, where she studied for a Ph.D. in pharmacy.

The change in beauty rules has had a direct impact on Camille Schrier’s candidacy. Earlier, however, she didn’t think she had a talent for acting, and with her mother’s encouragement, she finally decided to put the scientific experiment on the beauty pageant.

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

Figures . . . Camille Schrier with her mother (Source: Camille Schrier)

During the beauty contest, she also stressed the need to educate people about the dangers of abusing drugs, including opioids. This allows her to make the most of her expertise.

She told the jury: “I’m proud to break down stereotypes about Miss America. “

“I’m a scientist, that’s my job, and I want to show kids that and get them excited. “

Before winning Miss USA, Camille Schrier won the Miss Virginia pageant in June.

After 95, the scientist won the Miss USA crown, performed the chemical experiment in white.

(Source: Miss Virginia Selection Group)

Since then, Camille Schrier has toured Virginia, where she has shared awareness of drug safety and concerns about STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) education, and careers.

“I want to use this approach across the United States to get young people, especially young girls, interested in STEM and STEM-related careers and as role models for them.” She said in an interview.

With emphasis on knowledge, science and women’s rights, Camille Schrier has gained broader attention. General Electric invited her to speak at a lab in New York. “From one scientist to another, you make women in STEM proud and inspire a whole new generation of female scientists,” says Fiona Ginty from GE Research.

The good news is that the number of women choosing science and engineering is on the rise, and Helen Wollaston, a member of the WISE group that works to encourage British women to pursue STEM careers, says there are more than 5,000 more women getting an A rating on STEM subjects in 2018 than in previous years, but I We need to continue our efforts.

“Miss America can be a scientist, a scientist can be a Miss America. “Camille Schrier, who won the title, shouted this out, and behind it was the popular pursuit of “beauty” and the standard safter that had changed.

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