Gamma rays from the center of the Milky Way may be produced by dark matter.

BEIJING, Dec. 23 (Xinhua) — Mysterious dark matter may be the key to explaining gamma rays from the center of the Milky Way, according tomedia reports. A new paper by mIT physicists suggests that a previous model of dark matter as a source of gamma rays may have a fatal flaw.

Gamma rays from the center of the Milky Way may be produced by dark matter.

Dark matter may also be the source of mysterious gamma rays from the center of the Milky Way, new research suggests.

Rebecca Leane, a postdoctoral fellow at mIT’s Center for Theoretical Physics, said: “If it turns out that these signals are indeed dark matter, they will greatly affect our understanding of the universe.” We know that most of the universe is made up of dark matter, but we don’t know exactly what dark matter is. If dark matter signals are found, it will undoubtedly have a significant impact, and the process of uncovering the truth about dark matter will be very interesting. “

Since 2009, researchers have observed gamma rays from the center of the Milky Way several times and finally identified their source in 2016. Although observations suggest that collisions of dark matter may also be a factor, several papers have suggested at one point that pulsars (fast-rotating neutron stars) may be the source of these mysterious rays. Since then, “pulsar talk” has become a mainstream hypothesis commonly accepted by scientists.

Gamma rays from the center of the Milky Way may be produced by dark matter.

Scientists who have identified pulsars as the source of mysterious gamma rays also acknowledge the value of the latest research.

But the new study suggests that there may be a fatal flaw in previous computational models, and that the truth may not be linked to dark matter.

The study said scientists had previously used a model called “non-Poisson template” to locate light points in space, but the model may have mistook the light source for pulsars.

“This suggests that something might have gone wrong when using data to model, and that dark matter may have been the key to producing the milky milky milky milky galaxy’s central gamma rays,” the researchers wrote in the paper. However, this is not an effective evidence of the presence of dark matter, and gamma rays emitted from the center of the Milky Way may still be produced by a dot-ray source. “

The authors of the 2016 paper, which suggested that pulsars are the most likely source of these gamma rays, have acknowledged the flaws raised in recent studies, so scientists need to do more.

“In the search for dark matter, we have to carefully assess the uncertainty of each study,” said Mariangela Lisanti, a professor at Princeton University and one of the authors of the 2016 paper. “

Although Lesandi said the latest findings were not enough to completely rule out the possibility of pulsar ism, the researchers said dark matter had “returned to the field.” (Leaf)

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