Orion’s Four Continues to Darken, Astronomers Speculate on possible Supernova Explosion

One of the brightest stars in the sky, the Red Superstar Betelgeuse in Orion, has darkened in recent months, suggesting it is significantly less bright than usual, prompting some exciting speculation about whether the “monster” star will soon become a supernova,media CNET reported.

Orion's Four Continues to Darken, Astronomers Speculate on possible Supernova Explosion

Astronomers at Villanova University said earlier this month that the brightness of Suju IV was at “the lowest level in modern history.” This means that two things can happen: the four is a variable star, and its brightness has darkened and brightened several times over the past thousands of years. We may only see the dark moments of the last half-century. Most scientists who have been posting extensively about the giant on social media in recent weeks believe it is likely to be happening.

Orion's Four Continues to Darken, Astronomers Speculate on possible Supernova Explosion

Astronomer Yvette Cendes of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics wrote on Reddit on Friday: “Stars have undergone many changes in the latter stages of their lives, and we cannot fully explain them… It could be tens of thousands of years, or even less than 100,000 years. ” 。

Another speculation is that Shoicamp IV may be coming to the end of its life – a process that is expected to end with a spectacular supernova explosion.

Orion's Four Continues to Darken, Astronomers Speculate on possible Supernova Explosion

Rutgers University physicist Matthew Buckley also jokingly suggested that the recent darkening of Siosa may have been attributed to highly developed extraterrestrial civilizations. “No one asks a real question: Does it darken to indicate that someone is completing the signal around the Dyson sphere?” He wrote on Twitter on Monday.

The Dyson sphere is a hypothetical giant structure that the super-technological society may build around a star to collect a lot of energy.

The star is hundreds of light-years from Earth, which is very close to the universe, but we don’t have to worry about the impact of a supernova explosion on Earth. According to astronomer Sten Odenwald, about 10,000 years before the explosive remnants and high-energy X-rays arrive, humans will be protected by the sun and earth’s magnetic fields.

Astrophysicist Heloise Stavance even created a handy chart to analyze the data for Siosan:

Orion's Four Continues to Darken, Astronomers Speculate on possible Supernova Explosion

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