Japan’s Uniqlo uses Mujin robot to pack clothing factory to reach full automation

Uniqlo, the Japanese fashion giant, is close to completing an automated overhaul of its entire production process in partnership with Mujin, an industrial robotics start-up, British media reported on December 24. Most amazingly, industrial robots are able to skillfully fold and pack finished fashion products.

Japan's Uniqlo uses Mujin robot to pack clothing factory nears full automation

Uniqlo’s production line introduces intelligent robots developed by Mujin.

According to the Financial Times, it is not uncommon for robots to be used on industrial packaging lines, but robots usually handle heavy-duty industrial products, which require lightweight automation to avoid damage. Uniqlo’s parent company, Fast Retailing, has partnered with industrial robotics start-up Muijin to fully automate production lines with Intelligent Packing Robot.

Japan's Uniqlo uses Mujin robot to pack clothing factory nears full automation

Japan's Uniqlo uses Mujin robot to pack clothing factory nears full automation

Japan's Uniqlo uses Mujin robot to pack clothing factory nears full automation

Intelligent robots skillfully carry out garment folding and packaging, without damaging clothing and related paper documents.

Issei Takino, founder and executive chairman of MuijinĀ  said the two sides decided to work together because of the strength of the fast retail company to automate the transformation of its entire line. As of October 2018, 90 percent of uniqlo’s warehouse in Tokyo has been replaced by intelligent robots. Mujin’s intelligent robotuses use 3D imaging lenses to scan clothing products and then fold them up and pack them with precision.

It is reported that Uniqlo currently produces 1.3 billion pieces of fashion cloth a year, marketing more than 3,500 stores in 26 countries, huge production pressure and high labor costs forced fast retail companies to carry out fully automated transformation.

“We have to be a leader and continue to experiment, because only companies that can update their business models can survive,” said Takuya Jimbo, manager of Fast Retail. “

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