Space’s on fire? U.S. telescope captures light-emitting gas spanning 500 light-years

NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope recently captured a very strange image that looks like a flame tearing through black space. In fact, this image highlights the spectacular view of perseus Molecular Cloud, a 500-light-year mixture of gas and dust.

Space's on fire? U.S. telescope captures light-emitting gas spanning 500 light-years

Space's on fire? U.S. telescope captures light-emitting gas spanning 500 light-years

This fiery light is the result of warm dust and infrared radiation from clusters that illuminate the surrounding clouds just as the sun illuminates the cloudy sky at sunset.

The Constellation of Centain molecule cloud, located on the edge of ence, contains a large number of newborn stars, containing more than 10,000 solar-mass gases and dust. Infrared light from these gases and stars is invisible to the human eye, but the Spitzer telescope can capture images of warm objects.

Space's on fire? U.S. telescope captures light-emitting gas spanning 500 light-years

On the right side of this vast nebula is a bright young star cluster, known as NGC 1333, 1,000 light-years from Earth. Astronomers have observed the star since the mid-1980s, but the cluster beneath it remains a mystery.

NASA astrophysicist Luisa Rebull said: ‘It seems to contain babies, teenagers and adults in stars, and the combination of such a big difference seems strange. Although many stars may form tight clusters, they are always moving, and over time they tend to move farther and farther away. “

The discovery of such a dense, age-gaping mixture of stars is at odds with current views on how stars evolve. “This region tells astronomers that we still don’t know much about star formation,” Rebble said. “

However, the new instruments bring higher sensitivity and new technologies, and astronomical observations will become clearer in the future. On January 30, 2020, NASA will retire the Spitzer Space Telescope and replace it with the James Webb Space Telescope, which also has infrared detection capabilities.

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