U.S. military fights simulated missile attack in first test of new technology

The U.S. Coalition recently used a new command and control technology to identify and defeat simulated cruise missile attacks against the United States,media New Atlas reported. During this month’s three-day exercise, U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy departments used advanced combat management systems (ABMS) to work together to collect, analyze, and share large amounts of data in real time.

U.S. military fights simulated missile attack in first test of new technology

Today, one of the biggest trends in defense is recognition of the importance of data. By transforming everything from supercarriers to reconnaissance aircraft rifle sights into information-gathering and sharing platforms, commanders can offer amazing advantages with huge power multipliers at their fingertips.

A good example is the U.S. military’s ABMS joint operations exercise from December 16 to 18 as part of the U.S. effort to develop the Joint Field Command and Control (JADC2) concept over the next five years. The aim is to share large amounts of data in real time for military operations in the sea, land, space and cyberspace.

U.S. military fights simulated missile attack in first test of new technology

In recent exercises, U.S. Navy and Air Force aircraft, Navy destroyers, Army air defense sensors and firing platforms, special operations units, and commercial space and ground sensors have all found unmanned QF-16 full-size aerial target aircraft launched cruise missiles.

According to the Air Force, simulated missiles have been detected and the data against them has been forwarded to the UsS Thomas Hadner missile destroyer in the Gulf of Mexico, two Air Force F-35s, two F-22s, two Navy F-35s, and the commander of Elgin Air Force Base. Ground special forces and Army mobile missile launchers. These files provide real-time updates regardless of which platform you are using to send or receive data.

U.S. military fights simulated missile attack in first test of new technology

As part of a plan to develop the JADC2 concept, similar exercises are expected every four months and will include ways to improve speed and responsiveness by combining artificial intelligence, machine learning and other advances.

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