It’s not just crows that are smart: seabirds also use tools to ‘tickle’ themselves

One of the keys to distinguishing between humans and their primates is the use of tools. There are not many populations that are found to use tools, so it’s often exciting to find new species that have mastered the use of a tool. Now researchers from Oxford University and the South Iceland Natural Resources Centre say they have more concrete evidence that puffins, especially puffins, actually use tools. The study is published in the latest Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

We’ve all learned the crow’s story in elementary school textbooks, showing that it has the ability to use tools to get things done. And this new study is the first to show that seabirds have the ability to do the same. While studying grimsey Island, the team found that puffins use wooden sticks to “tickle.”

It's not just crows that are smart: seabirds also use tools to 'tickle' themselves

As the researchers explain, certain parts of the island’s puffin body are often affected by parasites, which can cause discomfort. At least some birds appear to have come up with solutions to this unfortunate problem, and they have been observed using sticks to touch hard-to-reach body parts.

It's not just crows that are smart: seabirds also use tools to 'tickle' themselves

It's not just crows that are smart: seabirds also use tools to 'tickle' themselves

This is an interesting finding, especially since the brains of puffins, such as puffins, are smaller and simpler than those of other birds that use tools, such as crows. The researchers found this in two separate locations, suggesting that this was not accidental.

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