UK: After election to decide whether to allow Huawei 5G

In April, Britain’s National Security Council decided to allow Huawei to participate in 5G “non-core” equipment and infrastructure projects. But after Mr Johnson came to power in July, the British government decided to delay the introduction of Huawei’s 5G, citing concerns about uncertainty over US sanctions. Just after the “Britain or allow Huawei to participate in 5G construction”, the British government announced that it would decide whether to introduce Huawei 5G after the General Election on December 12th.

Nicola Morgan, Britain’s digital culture, media and sport minister, said in response to a House of Commons inquiry on Tuesday that while the government intends to reach a conclusion on Huawei’s review this autumn, the timetable for the general election and the pre-election schedule could not be achieved, the Guardian reported.

“So the decision will be made by the next government,” she said. I expect that the future Government will inform Parliament of the decision at the appropriate time. Morgan’s position is often referred to as the “culture secretary” and includes the digital and telecommunications industries.

Britain will dissolve the House of Lords next Tuesday and hold a general election on December 12th, during which parliament will be unable to make a decision. Bloomberg on Thursday, citing people familiar with the matter, said it was expected that a decision on Huawei’s 5G would be difficult to make within this year, given the need to negotiate a coalition government after the election.

On the 31st, a recent Times poll showed Boris Johnson’s Conservatives leading Labour (24 per cent) by nearly 12 points, with 36 per cent of the vote.

英国最新表态:大选后决定是否允许华为5G

Recent polls show the Conservatives leading Labour by almost 12 points Source: See bottom right

In April, Britain’s National Security Council decided to allow Huawei to participate in 5G “non-core” equipment and infrastructure projects. But after Mr Johnson came to power in July, the British government decided to delay the introduction of Huawei’s 5G, citing concerns about uncertainty over US sanctions.

At the time, the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee also wrote to the government saying there was no technical reason to ban Huawei from 5G, suggesting it was a political decision.

On October 27th the Sunday Times quoted senior government sources as saying Mr Johnson was prepared to allow Huawei access to the “non-controversial” part of the UK’s future 5G telecommunications network.

Some of the technologies developed by Huawei are not available in Western countries, and the UK could be left behind if it doesnot do business with Huawei, the person said.

Thomas Tugendhat, chairman of the House of Commons Foreign Affairs committee, who wrote to the inquiry about Huawei, said he was pleased to learn that the decision would be made after it was referred to the new government.

He sees important foreign policy implications because it involves the Five Eyes Alliance, Britain’s most important security cooperation framework, and economic ties with the US, Canada and Australia. Previously, the UK was considered the first country in the Five Eyes Alliance to reject Huawei’s ban.

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