Ghosn escape ‘gang’ emerges: Pilot says he was coerced by family member or injured

In recent days, news of The Exodus of Carlos Ghosn, the former chairman of Nissan Motor Co., has been swirling about how he fled Japan. As the investigation progressed, some details of Ghosn’s escape emerged.

Details of Ghosn’s escape surfaced.

Ghosn fled Japan on a private jet after taking the Shinkansen.

Investigators confirmed that Ghosn left his home in Tokyo on foot at noon on December 29, 2019, and finally showed up at Shinagawa Station at around 4.30pm that day, before Ghosn got off at New Osaka Station and walked out of the station at around 7.30pm that day. A taxi was then taken to a hotel near Kansai International Airport.

Ghosn escape 'gang' emerges: Pilot says he was coerced by family member or injured

On the night of December 29, 2019, Ghosn was suspected to have left Japan by private jet from Kansai International Airport.

Ghosn escape 'gang' emerges: Pilot says he was coerced by family member or injured

Ghosn’s flight belonged to a Turkish airline.

The two planes that Ghosn used to escape reportedly belonged to a Turkish airline. In addition, two men from a U.S. civilian security company, one of whom was a former member of the U.S. Army Special Forces and is now a well-known security guard in the security industry.

Ghosn escape 'gang' emerges: Pilot says he was coerced by family member or injured

Turkish prosecutors charge allegedaiding Ghosn escapee

Turkish prosecutors have charged five people, including the pilot, over Carlos Ghosn’s flight from Turkey to Lebanon.

According to Reuters, one of the men charged confessed that he had been told by acquaintances that he needed to complete an “important international mission.” “He was coerced and if he didn’t get involved, his family would have been hurt,” the man said. He said he did not know that it was Ghosn who arrived at the Turkish airport at the time.

Ghosn’s hideout has a breathable hole in the bottom of the box, no security checks.

Investigators revealed that Carlos Ghosn’s escape was likely hidden in a black box used to hold audio equipment, with metal-reinforced parts at the corners of the box and breathable holes at the bottom of the box to facilitate breathing.

Ghosn escape 'gang' emerges: Pilot says he was coerced by family member or injured

According to information provided by the relevant staff of Kansai Airport, on the evening of December 29 last year, several large boxes with a height of more than 1 meter were too large to enter the X-ray security camera and were shipped directly to the private jet without being checked out of the box.

According to Mr Ghosn’s public relations chief, Mr Ghosn will hold a press conference in Lebanon on January 8 at 3pm local time (9pm BST), where he is expected to explain a series of suspected incidents and the reasons for his escape.

First voice, Japanese government says it will step up exit checks

On January 5, 2020 local time, Japan’s Minister of Justice, Yoshihide Satoson, said it was clearly illegal for Carlos Ghosn, the former chairman of Nissan Motor Co., to leave the country on bail and that Japan would step up exit checks for personnel in the future. This is the first time the Japanese government has spoken since Ghosn absconded on December 29, 2019.

Ghosn escape 'gang' emerges: Pilot says he was coerced by family member or injured

Senyako said Japan did not confirm Ghosn’s departure record and has revoked his bail. In order to avoid the recurrence of similar incidents, Japan will step up exit inspections in the future. But she did not mention what specific actions would be taken. Regarding Mr. Ghosn’s designation of judicial injustice in Japan, Mr. Mori said the Japanese judicial system protects fundamental human rights and due process, adding that the suspect sat away while on bail without any reason to exonerate him.

Ghosn escape 'gang' emerges: Pilot says he was coerced by family member or injured

Meanwhile, the Tokyo District Attorney’s Office on January 5 also identified Ghosn’s absconding as “ignoring the Japanese judicial process” and acting “equivalent to a crime”, saying that tokyo prosecutors will work closely with the relevant departments to find out Ghosn’s escape route as soon as possible.

Since Japan has only extradition treaties with the United States and South Korea, this means that it may be difficult for Japan to force Mr. Ghosn back from Lebanon to face trial. In addition, given Ghosn’s French citizenship, France has indicated that it would be difficult for Japan to extradite Mr. Ghosn from France if he returned.