Intel is getting closer to Google after Microsoft embraces AMD/ARM

In an interview last December, Intel CEO Bob Swan nun stressed that the company is no longer obsessed with monopolizing the individual processor market, expanding its target from 90 percent of the CPU market to 30 percent of the all-silicon market. Over the past few months, the chip giant has aggressively adjusted its strategic deployment, especially to better address the long-term dilemma of PC business development. At this year’s CES show, Intel found a new breakthrough — the Chromebook.

Intel is getting closer to Google after Microsoft embraces AMD/ARM

Intel is getting closer to Google after Microsoft embraces AMD/ARM

At the CES 2020 show, Intel announced a long-term and in-depth partnership with Google to design processors and other hardware and software for The Project Athena-compliant Chromebook. Project Athena, the framework, was first released last year and covers design and specifications designed to create the high-performance laptops of the future, not only for work, but also for media streaming, games, enterprise applications, and more.

Intel is getting closer to Google after Microsoft embraces AMD/ARM

Intel is getting closer to Google after Microsoft embraces AMD/ARM

Intel is getting closer to Google after Microsoft embraces AMD/ARM

Intel is getting closer to Google after Microsoft embraces AMD/ARM

More details about the Athena plan can be found on Intel’s official website at https://www.Intel.cn/content/www/cn/zh/products/docs/devices-systems/laptops/laptop-innovation-program.html

In addition to working with Google, Intel has launched a new Core mobile processor, codenamed Tiger Lake (like the old Ice Lake, named from Oregon’s natural attractions). A collapsible concept device called “Horseshoe Bend” is also shown, and more detailed coverage can be found in the links below this article. Both are in line with Athena’s plan.

In addition, Samsung and Asus have released new Chromebooks that match Athena’s plans, and Intel says more will be available in the future. “We’re working further to deepen our relationship with Google,” Gregory Bryant, executive vice president and general manager of Intel’s customer computing division, said in an interview with TechCrunch earlier today. to bring Athena to the Chromebook. We’ve worked closely with Google so that device manufacturers can take advantage of these specifications. “

“This is a big change for Google,” John Solomon, Google’s vice president of Chrome OS, said in an interview today. Chromebooks were initially successful in education, but over the next 18 months to two years, our plan is to expand to consumers and business users. These users have higher expectations and broader ideas about how to use these devices. This makes it our responsibility to provide more performance. “