media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

The 2020 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) opened in Las Vegas on Tuesday local time. What are the most interesting and strange products at the show? Simply put, it’s fake meat, fakes and fake privacy. The annual International Consumer Electronics Show is huge, covering an area of 270,000 square meters, but it is no longer the most influential technology product launch site.

Tech giants such as Apple, Google and Amazon have left the real good stuff to their spring and fall launches. Still, every year, the media take a look around the World Consumer Electronics Show looking for new ideas, practical devices, cute robots and incredible technology products.

This year, even politicians flocked to the International Consumer Electronics Show. White House adviser Ivanka Trump delivered a keynote address on Tuesday.

We’re excited about some of the trends at the show. Thanks to the new “foldable” technology, laptops are once again fun, OLED screens can be bent and folded; tvs can adjust their own screen settings; artificial meat is moving in new directions; and even the artificial people we can interact with become real people.

CeCe Can also be used to track some of the technology that is still in its infancy, including self-driving cars, artificial intelligence and augmented reality glasses. As the show’s biggest exhibit, TV is pushing for an update: 8K TVs, four times the pixels of ultra-high-definition 4K TVs.

There are also companies that promote suspicious safety and health devices, or integrate surveillance into everyday life. While technology companies are aggressively promoting the privacy features of their products, they are devouring user data like hungry hippos.

Here are some of the best, most noteworthy and strangest products the media has found at CES:

More real robot: Samsung man-made man NEON

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Star Labs, Samsung’s independent research arm, unveiled the “artificial man” named NEON at the show as part of an unprecedented marketing campaign at the International Consumer Electronics Show. NEON seems to be a computer-generated animation that looks like a character in a video game and has alexa-like conversational skills. Samsung describes NEON technology as “a virtual person created by calculation, whose appearance and behavior are similar to that of real humans and has the ability to express emotion and wisdom.” Samsung believes THAT NEON can help with “target-oriented tasks, or personalise tasks that require human manipulation.” NEON avatars can act as teachers, financial advisors, healthcare providers, concierges, actors, speakers, or television anchors.

The price of the product is not known and is expected to be available “in the near future”.

Self-balancing electric seat: Segway S-Pod

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Segway has released an electric seat, the S-Pod, that automatically keeps its balance. The function is similar to the chair that people sit in on a spaceship in the Robot General Mobilization movie. But the company says it was inspired by the gyrocopter in Jurassic World. The new mobile device is a mix of comfort lounge chairs, small electric cars and giant eggs that allow people to move freely in off-road locations such as shopping centres, airports and theme parks. The Segway S-Pod can reach a top speed of 39 km/h and can be controlled by a small knob or panel on the armrest. When the experiencer wears a helmet and tests the S-Pod prototype at the show, its speed limit is limited to 11 kilometers per hour and there is no seat belt. It feels fast and a little dangerous, more like a go-kart than a futuristic electric seat. At the International Consumer Electronics Show, companies announced a number of travel products, such as remote-controlled motorcycles, electric Off-road vehicles and real cars that are slowly approaching fully autonomous driving.

Translation machine: Google Translate

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

At last year’s International Consumer Electronics Show, Google Translate introduced a real-time translation model and integrated it into a smart display and placed it in a hotel near the show. This year, google has matured, and Google is starting to demonstrate the translation capabilities through Google’s Nest Hub device. Google has sold it as a service to companies such as hotels and banks. At present, John F. Kennedy is a Services have been set up at the information desk in the international terminal at F. Kennedy International Airport, stadiums in Qatar, and major hotel chains. Google Translate is not the only provider of translation technology at the show. Companies such as Pocketalk and Waverly Labs also exhibited their own translation techniques at the show. Part of the boom is advances in artificial intelligence, especially natural language processing.

Users can now use this feature in the lobby of a nearby hotel.

Smart Glasses Nreal

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

For nearly a decade, we’ve heard that the future is computing-oriented. This hasn’t happened yet, but the technology that applies augmented reality to glasses is improving. Real looks almost identical to normal sunglasses – except for a small protrusion and a long data line connected to a smartphone. However, the Beijing-based start-up has managed to cram a large number of devices into lightweight products weighing only about 32.5 grams, including front-facing cameras that can locate virtual objects in a room, and built-in operating systems that support almost all Android apps. Its stealth camera even supports capture. The field of view of the related augmented reality screen is limited to about 52 degrees. When users watch test videos and run augmented reality games, the virtual images are clearly identifiable.

The product is priced at $500 and will go on sale in early 2020.

Artificial Pork: Impossible Pork

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

For the first time ever, The makers of Impossible Burger began trying to mimic the taste of pork. On Monday, the company announced the launch of two new artificial pork products: “Artificial Sausage Breakfast Patties” and “Artificial Pork Stuffing”. “Artificial sausage breakfast meatloaf” will be available at some Burger King restaurants. The news comes at a time of turmoil for the global pork industry. For the past year and a half, the global pork industry has been struggling with the swine fever outbreak in Africa, with limited supply. Impossible Foods did not disclose details of when or where new products will be launched, but if priced at reasonable prices, it could find a lucrative market in Asia.

Impossible Foods has not yet announced the price of the product. “Artificial Sausage” will go on sale at 139 Burger King stores in the U.S. at the end of January. The time for the “artificial pork filling” has not yet been announced.

How to Control Privacy: Amazon Privacy Dashboard

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Amazon is finally starting to heed users’ concerns about the safety and privacy of its products. The company has released a new software dashboard that lets users manage devices and services and access connected to connected doorbell Ring and other home cameras, as well as giving users the option to deny police access to Ring surveillance video. But many users want Ring to make more substantial changes, such as defaulting on two-factor account verification or explicitly not sharing videos with the police. Instead, Ring continues to shift the responsibility for security and privacy to users.

Later this month, users can upgrade their dashboards for free in the Ring mobile app.

Companion Robot: Bocco Emo

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

For most conversational skills, everyone wants a clear answer to the question. But from Bocco Emo, most of the user gets nonsense. That’s the point: Bocco Emo is an companion robot. It listens to what the user says and responds emotionally when appropriate by grunting, gingnorting, or cackling. The robot’s head also moves rhythmically. Yukai Engineering, a Tokyo-based robot manufacturer, believes that robots can play an important role in human emotional life when we are alone, especially in an aging society. Bocco Emo can also do more practical tasks, such as turning smart lights on and off.

The price of the product is to be determined and shipped in May 2020.

Simpler wireless charging: Aira FreePower

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Wireless charging is not as effective as we would like it to be, and it often requires the charging device to be in the right place. And the user can only charge one thing at a time. Apple has canceled a multi-device charging program called AirPower, which was due to be launched in 2018. Now a startup called Aira says it has found a solution. The company’s FreePower technology lets you charge multiple devices at the same time without having to pay attention to their location on the wireless charging board. The company says it has redesigned the coil matrix to better plan the magnetic field needed for charging. Aira, who was a success on the Shark Tank TV show, is selling its technology to other companies, such as the Nomad brand’s Wireless Chargers.

The Nomad Base Station Pro wireless charging device with FreePower does not have a price or launch date.

Foldable laptop: Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Fold

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

The trend in collapsible screen design, which we first saw on mobile phones, is spreading to the laptop space. Lenovo is ready to launch a 13-inch collapsible-screen laptop that can be closed like a book, flat like a tablet, or converted into 90 degrees to use like a mini-laptop. Users can type via a removable wireless keyboard. When the laptop screen is folded, the keyboard is embedded in the middle. Lenovo says the ThinkPad X1 Fold will appeal to people who need all the functionality of the Windows 10 Pro system but don’t like to carry a traditional laptop with them. The 1kg ThinkPad X1 Fold feels a little thicker when folded, but it also seems to be a direction for a laptop.

Priced at $2,499, it will go on sale by mid-2020.

Rotating TV: Samsung Sero

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

People are used to holding their phones vertically and keep ingress videos. When you look at Instagram or TikTok on your phone, the vertical screen works well, but it looks bad on a horizontal TV. Samsung’s newly released Sero TV can now rotate and switch freely between horizontal and vertical directions. You can sync the content of your Samsung Galaxy phone to your Sero TV, and it automatically switches directions based on what you see.

Samsung has not yet announced a price and will be available in the U.S. market in early 2020.

Smartwatch that detects sleep apnea: Withings ScanWatch

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Health problems that smartwatches can detect add to sleep apnea. Wearable device maker Withings has added a SpO2 sensor to its new ScanWatch to measure oxygen saturation levels and identify low-level slots to determine whether users have sleep apnea. In addition, ScanWatch tracks sleep time, depth, and quality, and provides nighttime sleep scores. It can also track user movement, monitor heart rate and detect arrhythmia. Even better, the watch battery can keep the device running for 30 days.

The product, which costs $250, will be available in spring 2020.

Unmarked Tattoo Printer: Prinker

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

In recent years, the tattooless tattoo technology has not changed much. You can buy them, order custom tattoos online, or print your own tattoos at home. The new device, called Prinker, makes it easy for users to leave temporary, unmarked tattoos for themselves. This handheld tattoo printer can apply harmless ink to the skin, and images can be selected from the companion app or added on their own. The beauty is that Prinker can only print an inch-wide pattern, so it takes time to make a long string of patterns on your arm, but the only limit to the length of the tattoo is the length of your body. Although the final tattoo will not get dirty or fade, it can be easily washed off with soap and water.

The cost is $269 and is listed in mid-2020.

High-tech sex products: The sex toy developed by Lora DiCarlo

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

This year’s International Consumer Electronics Show allows high-tech sex products to be exhibited. Os? is a unique lying product that automatically controls the frequency and manner of vibration, giving users an unprecedented experience. In addition, Lora DiCarlo has released two other similar products. According to statistics, the exhibition has about a dozen similar high-tech products.

The product, which costs $290, is now on the market.

8K TV is coming: LG Signature OLED 8K TV and Curlable TV

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Illustration: LG’s Curlable TV

What are TV makers selling to users who already have the latest 4K HDTVs? The answer will be 8K TV. LG will release a series of 8K TVs later this year and says it is targeting consumers who have bigger screens in smaller spaces. There is not much 8K video content, but like Samsung, LG will use deep learning algorithms to improve the quality of 4K movies and TV shows. LG is also working on another big TV technology innovation: curlable tv. LG said this year’s curly TV will finally determine the price and go on sale. This is a 65-inch 4K OLED TV. The screen can be rolled up into a cabinet, the user watching TV, just press the button on the remote control, OLED TV will slowly rise.

The Curly TV is yet to be priced and will be available later this year.

TV-backed filmmaker mode

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Illustration: Makoto Morise, Panasonic Group Manager, speaks at the Ultra HD Alliance Filmmaker Mode Launch.

Many TVs now have automatic color enhancement and smoothing of motion, making movies and programs look unreal. Including Paul Thomas Anderson, Ryan Coogler, Patty Jenkins, Martin Scorsese and Christopher Nolan . Filmmakers, including Christopher Nolan, thought they had had enough of it, so they formed an industry alliance called UHD Alliance to support a new “filmmaker model.” Using Filmmaker mode in television disables post-processing systems, such as smoothmotion, noise reduction, and sharpening, while retaining frame rate, color, and aspect ratio. So far, a number of large TV manufacturers, including Vizio, Panasonic, Samsung and LG, have signed up.

Some models of TVs available in 2020 will support this feature.

Sleep aids: Hatch Restore

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

This bedside lamp combines a white noise generator to help users fall asleep and wake up more easily. Restore changes color and brightness based on the user’s sleep habits: yellow for gradualrelaxation reading time, and white for waking up. And the device is equipped with a calm ingress sound at each different time period, even recording the user’s meditation habits. Users can find and set up their own correct night sleep program through companion apps. Developers say Restore’s sound and color are based on cognitive behavioral science, and the program will make you sleep better.

Products are priced in the morning and will be available in early 2020.

Home Privacy Assistant: Winston

Media look at CES eye-catching products: artificial meat, artificial people, artificial privacy

Winston is able to help users with privacy. The device is installed between a WiFi router and a modem, and the circumvention strategy can reduce data usage on all devices in the home. Not only is Winston a virtual privacy network, it can also scan traffic to and from homes, block ads, filter tracking cookies, crack down on website “fingerprinting” and hide Internet addresses. In addition, Winston claims to be able to speed up network connectivity by blocking ads and online tracking. Users pay a service charge of $8.25 per month, free of charge for the first year.

The product, which costs $249, is now on the market.