Nature hasn’t given up on Fukushima in the event of a nuclear accident: there are still plenty of mammals infested

In 2011, when the earthquake and tsunami hit Japan, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered its worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl disaster,media reported. Like Chernobyl, the risk of radiation in the area around the Fukushima plant is increasing, forcing officials to set up a quarantine zone to prevent more casualties. Unless there are very special reasons to enter the restricted area, human beings are not allowed to enter the disaster area, difficult nature? Well, that’s another story.

Nature hasn't given up on Fukushima in the event of a nuclear accident: there are still plenty of mammals infested

Not only are exclusion zones not what many people might think of as “wild lands”, but there are actually plenty of wildlife living there, according to a new study published in Frontiers in Ecology.

It is understood that a team of researchers installed up to 120 cameras in the Fukushima quarantine area. They were filmed for two months at two different times of the year. By the end of the survey, the cameras had taken more than 267,000 photos, meaning researchers had enough images to carry out their research.

The researchers said they found no evidence that large and medium-sized mammals or herds were affected by population levels, and that despite radiation contamination, several species were among the most abundant in the human evacuation zone. In their view, these data provide unique evidence of natural wilding, and also claim that if there are any large and medium-sized mammals affected by radiation, it is only an isolated phenomenon.

In short, even with elevated radiation levels, these animals have exhibited exactly the same behavior as humans did when they left them alone. If these animals are affected by radiation, then these effects are not obvious and the amount of movement they move seems to be normal.