Swedish scientists develop non-antibiotic gel that can cure wounds in two ways

Swedish scientists have developed a gel that can be used to heal wounds that not only kill strains that are resistant to antibiotics, but also reduce inflammation in the wounds, according tomedia New Atlas. Researchers believe it could one day replace antibiotic-based drugs. The gel, developed by scientists at Lund University, contains a peptide called TCP-25.

Swedish scientists develop non-antibiotic gel that can cure wounds in two ways

Peptides are short chains of amino acids that are naturally present in the body, and although they do help prevent infection by killing harmful bacteria at the wound site, they can sometimes be “suppressed” if there are too many bacteria. The gel works by introducing more peptides. In addition, peptides have been found in molecules called lipid polysaccharides, which are found in the cell walls of bacteria. Typically, these molecules produce an inflammatory response in the host organism – if the inflammation gets out of control, the wound’s healing is delayed.

In laboratory tests on rats and pigs, the gel reduced wound inflammation within 24 hours of use. Then, over a period of three to four days, significantly reduced the number of Staphylococcus aureus and copper-green pseudomonas.

Swedish scientists develop non-antibiotic gel that can cure wounds in two ways

The university is currently working with Swedish biomedical start-up in2cure to commercialize the technology and hopes it will soon be used in clinical trials for human burn victims. Nevertheless, the possibilities are not limited to the treatment of trauma.

Lead scientist Professor Artur Schmidtchen said: “We will also be studying the possibility of new peptide-based drugs for eye and other internal organ infections. This could be a new way to treat infections and inflammation without antibiotics. “

The paper on the study was recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.