Scientists show 3D movies to cut the water to see if they can sense depth

In recent years, 3D movies have become so popular that many people have even set up 3D playback systems in their own homes. Recently, however, a team of researchers came up with the idea of wearing 3D glasses on a fish to see if it could sense depth, just like humans. It is reported that octopuses and other cephalopods are able to move their eyes independently of each other to gain a 360-degree view. The reason for choosing to study molyz is that their eyes are positioned to look at distant objects.

Scientists show 3D movies to cut the water to see if they can sense depth

(Pictured: Wardill Lab, via Cnet)

Using this 3D movie viewing experiment, scientists are expected to see if the molybnos can form stereoscopic vision, even if their eyes move differently from the human eye.

Stereovision, known as stereovision, is the collection of slightly different information observed by the two eyes, and then through the complex processing of the brain to perceive depth. Common 3D glasses are similar techniques to create deep illusions.

Cuttlefish given 3D glasses to how how they distance (via)

To fix 3D glasses to the ink fish, the team, led by University of Minnesota researcher Trevor Wardill and fellow university colleague Rachael Feord, simply used an ultra-stick velhed.

They then put the ink fish wearing 3D glasses in the fish tank and play a “water curtain 3D movie” featuring shrimp.

Scientists show 3D movies to cut the water to see if they can sense depth

Interestingly, when the ink fish seethe projected shrimp, their eyes move slightly differently. By making the image of the shrimp look closer or farther, the ink fish wearing 3D glasses also changes its impact distance and then suddenly acts toward the target.

Trevor Wardill told the Guardian on Wednesday: “If you separate these images for a long distance, the fish will mistake the shrimp for really close to it, and then try to back off and shoot the tentacles in front of them.” If the shrimp looks behind the screen, the molymuch fish will swim in.”

Scientists show 3D movies to cut the water to see if they can sense depth

“It’s a bit strange to know about creatures like molyz or mantis, and knowing them can help you find a variety of machine vision studies that are appropriate for different situations, such as drones, vacuum cleaner sensors, or security cameras,” says The University of Newskar.

Unsurprisingly, after the report was published, there was a lot of discussion on Twitter.

Scientists show 3D movies to cut the water to see if they can sense depth

Details of the study were published Wednesday in the journal Advances science.

Originally published as Cuttlefish can attack prey with stereovision (Cuttlefish usepsis to strike at prey).