The path, discovered by scientists, extends the life of nematodes by 500 percent

A study on longevity was published recently in the journal Cell Reports, a unit of Cell Press. A team of scientists from Nanjing University, MDI Biolab, and Buck’s Institute of Aging found that a pathway significantly prolongs the life of nematodes. You know, this extension is not 20% or 50%, but 500%!

The path, discovered by scientists, extends the life of nematodes by 500 percent

How did this discovery come about? Let’s take a look at it in today’s article. First, the scientists chose nematodes as their subjects. It’s a slender worm, one of the most commonanimal models used by biologists. Since the animal’s normal lifespan is only 3-4 weeks, we will soon see changes in the life of any gene that can extend life.

In the study, the scientists focused on two known signaling pathways, one insulin signaling pathway and the toR signaling pathway. In past studies, these two pathways have been found to be associated with the life span of nematodes, which can increase their lifespan by about 100 percent and 30 percent, respectively.

The path, discovered by scientists, extends the life of nematodes by 500 percent

Photo source: http://www.genome.gov/10000570%20

If both paths are changed, how will they affect the life span of nematodes? The researchers made an attempt, and the results were a big surprise – “the synergy between the two pathways was crazy,” said Dr. Jarrod Rollins, one of the study’s co-authors. “

The scientists concluded that the results suggest that there must be a special link between the two pathways behind them. Further digging, they found that this longevity was associated with mitochondria. This is the “energy factory” in the cell, and for more than a decade, studies have shown that this organometer is associated with longevity. If the mitochondria are dysfunctional, it can cause a series of aging-related phenomena.

The path, discovered by scientists, extends the life of nematodes by 500 percent

Illustration of this study (Image Source: Resources)

In the study, scientists found a key longevity regulator, called CYC-2.1, a cytochrome. Studies have shown that reducing the expression of CYC-2.1 activates the “non-folding protein reaction” in the mitochondria and promotes mitochondrial division. This significantly extends the life of nematodes.

“Although the cell pathways that regulate lifespan in nematodes have long been discovered, it has been unclear how these pathways are interwoven,” Dr. Hermann Haller, president of the MDI Biolab, said in an official press release. Increase their healthy life expectancy for a rapidly aging population. “

The researchers also point out that while the findings come from nematodes, similar pathways are relatively conservative. In the future, they plan to explore the future of the discovery.