House of Representatives to draw up new law that would give parents button to require websites to remove information about their children

Over the past year, U.S. lawmakers have renewed a sense of urgency to rewrite parts of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA),media reported. CopPA has become increasingly important in the cases against YouTube and TikTok, but the law has been around for more than 20 years, and lawmakers say it needs to embrace a major overhaul to keep children safe on the Internet.

House of Representatives to draw up new law that would give parents button to require websites to remove information about their children

Tim Walberg Infographic

On Thursday, local time, members of both parties announced that they would introduce their own bill, which would give parents the right to delete data from their children owned by the company, and extend COPPA protections to older minors. The new law is known as “Preventing Real Cyber Threat Crisis Children (or PROTECT Kids Act) ” and was proposed by Reps. Tim Walberg (R-Minnesota) and Bobby Rush (D-Illinois).

The bill would make a major update to the laws that have made a huge difference to YouTube and TikTok and angered creators. In a settlement with YouTube, the FTC fined the company $170 million and banned it from running targeted ads in videos it deems child-friendly. Many critics argue that the settlement goes far enough and that YouTube and other online platforms will come under more pressure if THE PROTECT Kids Act is finally approved.

Under current law, COPPA only prohibits platforms from collecting data on children under the age of 13. According to the new PROTECT Kids Act, this age coverage will be adjusted to 16. In addition, COPPA’s definition of “personal information” does not include precise geo-location and biometric information, and the new law will change that.