Tracking 100,000 people over 7 years: Study says drinking green tea is longer than black tea

On January 8th a new study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology by a team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences showed that people who used to drink green tea had a one-fifth lower risk of fatal heart disease and stroke, but there was no indication that drinking black tea was significantly linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

The chinese Academy of Medical Sciences team studied 100,902 participants over a 7.3-year period, none of whom had a history of heart disease, stroke or cancer, the report said.

The researchers divided the participants into two groups, one of whom was used to drinking tea three or more times a week, and those who had never had tea or were not used to tea, i.e. drinking tea less than three times a week.

It was found that people who drank regular tea had coronary artery disease or stroke at age 50, an average of 1.41 years later and 1.26 years longer than those who were not used to drinking tea.

People who were used to drinking tea had a 20 percent lower risk of heart disease and stroke, a 22 percent lower risk of fatal heart disease and stroke, and a 15 percent lower risk of death than those who were not used to drinking tea.

Drinking green tea has significant benefits for men, but less in women, the researchers said. One reason may be that men who drink green tea are about two and a half times as likely as women.

The researchers also noted that there was no evidence in the study that drinking black tea had a significant link to reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Tracking 100,000 people over 7 years: Study says drinking green tea is longer than black tea