Grass growing around Mount Everest due to global warming: or more flooding

After studying satellite images provided by NASA, more grass and shrubs have grown around Mount Everest and in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region, which could lead to more flooding in the region, according to a paper published in Global Change Biology. Researchers at the University of Exeter found that plant cover increased between 1993 and 2018 by analyzing satellite maps provided by NASA at altitudes between 4,150 and 6,000 meters above sea level, the report said. Studies have shown that the arctic’s increased vegetation absorbs more light to warm the surface.

Grass growing around Mount Everest due to global warming: or more flooding

“This is bad news for the Himalayas because there is seasonal snow in the region, and if warm, it melts, increasing the risk of flooding,” said Karen Anderson of the University of California. “

It is reported that the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region covers an area of 1.6 million square kilometers, for Asia’s top ten rivers water supply.

But some experts say plants may be cooling through the moisture that evaporates from the leaf surface, but scientists have yet to draw a conclusion on the effects of increased vegetation.

Earlier, there have been studies that have suggested that thousands of haillakes in the Himalayas are at risk of breaking through hail due to global warming, with the risk of flooding downstream due to ice lake collapse flooding.