New study reveals key cells involved in obesity: it will help treat obesity and related complications

A paper published in the journal Molecular Metabolism suggests that the absence of the iRhom2 protein can lead to increased energy consumption in adipose tissue, which may help treat obesity and related complications,media reported. Obesity is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes development, and is associated with chronic inflammation of adipose tissue. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms involved in metabolic disorders is critical to solving the obesity problem.

New study reveals key cells involved in obesity: it will help treat obesity and related complications

Colin Adrain, one of the study’s authors, said: “Understanding the basic mechanisms of metabolic abnormalities is very important. In the course of our study, we found that iRhom2 protein sits in large quantities in metabolic tissues and organs, which led us to study the role of iRhom2 in obesity in more detail. “

Using an animal model, the researchers compared groups of iRhom2 protein deficiency to the non-missing control group and fed them on a normal diet and a high-fat diet.

The researchers found significantly higher levels of iRhom2 protein in brown adipose tissue in obese animals than in the control group containing iRhom2 protein. They then found that animals that lacked iRhom2 protein in a high-fat diet were even more metabolically healthy than wild animals.

Marina Badenes, lead author of the study, said: “The absence of iRhom2 leads to an increase in energy consumption in adipose tissue, which protects animals from fat build-up and inflammation, fatty liver and insulin resistance when placed in a diet that is prone to obesity. “

In addition, the researchers found that at the cellular level, the absence of iRhom2 led to an increase in heat production of brown adipose tissue, an important physiological mechanism for consuming excess body energy.

It is noted that no harmful side effects were found in animals missing iRhom2, suggesting that blocking iRhom2 may help treat obesity and related complications.

The researchers plan to continue the project to learn more about the mechanisms and cell types of the iRhom2 protein that controls obesity.