Tourists record scene of volcanic eruption in the Philippines: like a disaster film

On January 12, taal, an active volcano near Manila, the Capital of the Philippines, erupted without warning, sending ash plummeting 10-15 kilometers into the clouds and even spreading to the city of Quezon, 72 kilometers away, triggering an earthquake and tsunami. Because there was no warning from nearby tourists before the eruption, a large number of tourists witnessed the moment of the eruption and recorded the eruption on their mobile phones.

The volcano not only spewed ash up to 1km long, but also triggered thunderstorms, which were like a disaster.

Tourists record scene of volcanic eruption in the Philippines: like a disaster film

Located just 65 km from Manila, the Philippine capital, Mount Taal is one of the smallest but most active volcanoes in the world and the second most active volcano in the Philippines, with 33 recorded eruptions and considered one of the world’s most dangerous. This followed an eruption of Mount Taal in 1911 that killed more than 1,300 people.

Now, the Philippine Institute of Volcanic Seismological Research has warned that Taal volcano activity is “rapidly escalating” and could erupt again in hours to days. About 8,000 residents and tourists near the volcano have been evacuated, Manila International Airport has been temporarily closed and a large number of passengers have been stranded.

Tourists record scene of volcanic eruption in the Philippines: like a disaster filmTourists record scene of volcanic eruption in the Philippines: like a disaster film