Psychological Analysis: Why do you suddenly be afraid to fly?

According tomedia reports, people sometimes encounter a situation in which they suddenly feel a fear of flying, and who have been flying frequently for many years, and who have been in a state of panic without caring about things. Let’s take a look at how several psychologists have explored the root causes of flight phobia.

Psychological Analysis: Why do you suddenly be afraid to fly?

Captain Tom Bunn

Registered therapist and airline captain, author of “Flying at High Altitude: Breakthrough Therapy for Flight Fears”, whose high-altitude flight training helps people overcome flight fears.

“Once we think that escape is essential in life, we panic when we are in a situation where we can’t escape immediately. These include sudden elevator stops, bridge collapses, tunnel collapses, subway failures, being in the mountains, sitting in the middle of a theater, sitting in a dentist’s chair, having an MRI, and, of course, flying by plane. “

When someone has suffered a traumatic experience, phobias can be understood. However, when a fear appears for no reason, it is puzzling, but the probability of an inexplicable fear appearing is very high. At least half of the customers on my flight had no difficulty on their first flight, but when they boarded the plane they were inexplicably frightened, claiming that they could not board and that the average age of people with phobias was 27.

This phobia occurs when we mature and realize that something may end our lives, and when we first become a parent, the phobia begins to worry about what they will do if something happens to our children. How to raise awareness of vulnerability is a problem, what do we need to pay attention to? Obviously there’s a lot of on this list, and we’re not sure what issues to avoid.

Some people try to avoid anything new, and in the so-called “agoraphobia”, people hide in a corner, maybe just a house, to gain a sense of security, but most of us will turn to control. We try to control everything in order not to let something affect us, but if we can’t control everything, we need an alternative, and our Plan B is “escape.” Since our ability to control things is not absolute, then we need an ability to escape: it is absolute.

Once we think that escape is essential in life, we are in a state where we can’t escape immediately, and we panic. These include sudden elevator stops, bridge collapses, tunnel collapses, subway failures, being in the mountains, sitting in the middle of a theater, sitting in a dentist’s chair, having an MRI, and, of course, flying by plane.

Most of us have a healthy way to control our emotions: a psychotherapy that activates the body’s sedative system, a parasympathetic nervous system that, when something shocking happens, and we panic, it lasts only a fraction of a second, and then automatically turns into a curiosity about what’s happening. This automatic adjustment of thinking is necessary to prepare for the decision to do something.

If someone doesn’t develop the ability to automatically adjust their fear, they remain alert until the stress hormone that causes this feeling disappears. Since the execution function does not work when warned, he does not know what is going on or how to do it. This lack of executive capacity can lead to terrible nightmares of fear, and when faced with a dangerous situation, the body becomes stiff and unable to move, meaning that they cannot control themselves, cannot escape the scene quickly, and can only be trapped in tension and panic.

Debra Hope

A professor of psychology at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln University, his work focuses on the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders.

“When you’re under high pressure, you’re going into a situation you might not be often in, you’re going to have a different mindset, you’re looking for fear, you’re looking for a source of danger.” “

Fear of not knowing where to go in people’s daily lives is rare, and usually there is a low level of easy-to-control fear of flying, which, for some reason, suddenly gets worse, and when you really care, it’s not so unexpected.

One reason people develop flight fear is stress and anxiety, they may worry about their work, relationships, or sick family members, and flight fears can be a positive source of stress, such as moving or getting married, and worrying about a flight accident. When you are in a state of high stress, you will enter a situation you may not always maintain, you will have a different mindset, you will look for fear, look for sources of danger.

Sometimes these things happen when people’s lives change, and they feel like they’re going to lose something, especially when people are first-time parents and they think, “Oh my God! How will the plane crash and what will my children do? In fact, flight fears, high-altitude fears, or fear of driving a vehicle, like social anxiety, exist in people’s daily lives.

Seth J. Gillihan)

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

“This sense of threat will trigger a more specific fear, which may be a way to protect someone from a real source of terror (their own death). “

I have treated many people who have developed fear in their lives, including the fear of flying. This often happens to young parents, especially young mothers, who suddenly feel the effects of a disaster during flight when they board a plane. If they travel alone, they fear losing their parents, and if they travel with their children, they worry about their children’s safety. Fear is very closely connected to us and others, and when that connection is threatened, we feel a strong fear.

As hormonal changes also create new fears, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, especially estrogen, which is associated with a calming fear response, and as estrogen levels drop, the fear response increases. I have treated middle-aged patients with claustrophobia, hyperphobia and various types of obsessive-compulsive disorder, which have no obvious external causes other than an increase in age.

Some people’s fear in life will come to life when they begin to realize that they are going to die. When they are young, they feel they have unlimited potential, but that potential begins to become very limited as they realize that what they have experienced and accomplished in their lifetimes is limited. This sense of threat will trigger a more specific fear, which may be a way to protect someone from a real source of terror (their own death).

Graham C.L. Davey)

Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Sussex, UK

“When people are stressed in their lives, they often cause panic, and in some cases there is a long-term panic disorder, so when they fly, they are likely to cause flight phobias. “

Flight phobia is not as obvious as people think, it is rarely associated with fear, but it is closely related to panic attacks, when people begin to experience regular, uncontrollable panic attacks, panic disorder appears, usually people board the plane fear of panic behavior, leading to flight phobia.

The reason for this is that when someone experiences a panic attack, they usually immediately flee to a “safe place”, such as their home, so that they are not embarrassed by a public panic, and sometimes they think they are prone to a heart attack or vomiting, but these are rare. For passengers on planes at 30,000 feet, however, fear of phobias is superfluous, they can’t escape from the plane, and in fact they are afraid of enclosed spaces, not fear of flying altitudes.

When people are stressed in their lives, they often cause panic, and in some cases long-term panic disorder, so when they fly, they are likely to trigger flight phobias, sometimes they do not need to experience the flight in person to have flight phobia, as long as the thought of such phobia, will avoid flight planning.

Michelle Shiota

Associate Professor and Dean of Social Psychology, Arizona State University, USA

“For some reason, one day you’ll suddenly increase your fear, perhaps if you accidentally fell, watched a horror movie about a plane crash recently, or experienced a vertigo caused by a biological cause, and whatever causes your attention, you may start experiencing more fear.” “

It is not impossible to develop a spontaneous phobia in people’s lives, but it is unusual for a flight phobia to occur. Often a strong sense of fear is formed after childhood and is associated with serious risk or injury. The evidence suggests that the amygdala (which is commonly thought to be associated with fear in the brain) actually enhances people’s memory function sympathising pre-traumatic or stimulating situations, and when these scenarios or stimuli reappear, the amygdala appears to reactivate the memories it experienced before and awakens previous fears. This process is basically post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

However, there is another way for people to suddenly have never-had a fear, which is a change in attention, assuming that you are a frequent passenger who never really looks out of the window, and who never really thinks about how far you are from Earth. For some reason, one day you’ll suddenly increase your fear, perhaps if you accidentally fall, watch a horror movie about a plane crash recently, or experience a vertigo caused by a biological cause, and whatever causes your attention, you may start experiencing more fear.

At this point, it doesn’t matter what causes your distractions, you may experience more fear in some ordinary situation, and when you fly, you suddenly take into account more potential dangers, and once this potential-related attention process begins, it escalates, evoking psychological images and emotional responses.