Thousands of young stars from other galaxies found on the edge of the Milky Way

The Milky Way is killing some galaxies, and the Milky Way has already devoured some of their stars. Two new papers published in the Astrophysical Journal suggest that thousands of strange young stars have been found on the edge of the Milky Way, most likely from the Great Magellanic Galaxy, the result of the Milky Way’s constant swallowing before, and the pair will eventually be completely devoured by the Milky Way.

Thousands of young stars from other galaxies found on the edge of the Milky Way

Thousands of strangeyoung young stars have been found on the edge of the Milky Way, most likely from the Great Magellanic Galaxy, the result of the Milky Way’s previous swallowing, and the pair will eventually be completely devoured by the Milky Way.

These stars are prominent in the far corners of the Milky Way, where there have not been many new stars in recent times, rather than in the more active, denser center of galaxies, where most of the available fuel has run out, and analysis shows that these stars from other galaxies are relatively young. These stars are located in a very remote region, and all the young stars of the Milky Way are located in the disk structure of the galaxy, so scientists want to figure out exactly what happened.

Further studies have shown that these newly discovered star compositions differ from those of the Milky Way’s primary stars, and by analyzing their light bands, the results show that at least 27 of the brightest stars have very low metal content, meaning that their composition comes from outside the Milky Way. The second study notes that these stars are most likely to come from the Magellan galaxy, which is less dense enough to emit gas clouds that extend toward the Milky Way.

It is likely that the gas in the Magellan galaxy’s airstream passed through the Milky Way at some point, colliding with the Milky Way’s native gas to create impact pressure ( a kind of shock wave) that combines with the force’s gravity to compress the air flow from the Magellan galaxy and bring it together under its own gravity , the researchers said . Once this happens, some gas clusters will be dense enough to form stars, making it less likely that young, low-metal stars will appear in the region.

This is a very important discovery that could help scientists pinpoint the location of the Magellan galaxy’s gas flow, and most methods of calculating the distance between stars or galaxies and Earth are not effective in applying loose gas clouds, so researchers need to “landmark” locate these objects. Based on these newly discovered stars, the researchers say the gas stream is about 90,000 light-years from the Milky Way, closer than expected.

If the Magellanic gas flow approaches the Milky Way, especially the milky main arm, it is likely to fit into the Milky Way faster than the current predictive model, which will help astronomers build better models of the Magellanic Cloud and Gas Flow to determine the future direction of the system and how it will operate in the future. This is critical to understanding the future evolution of the Milky Way.

Eventually, these gases will form new stars in the Milky Way disk, and now the Milky Way is consuming gas faster than the refueling gas, which will replenish the Milky Way’s “storage” to ensure that the Milky Way continues to produce new stars.