World Economic Forum: Last Mile Delivery Will Increase Congestion, Increase Carbon Emissions

BEIJING( 15 (Xinhua) — The growth of “last mile delivery” services over the next 10 years could lead to more congestion and increased carbon emissions in major cities around the world, according to a study released Friday by the World Economic Forum. The researchers expect the number of delivery cars in the world’s top 100 cities to increase by 36 percent by 2030, carbon emissions from delivery cars to increase by nearly a third, and congestion to increase by more than 21 percent. This congestion will mean an additional 11 minutes of commuting time per passenger per day.

World Economic Forum: Last Mile Delivery Will Increase Congestion, Increase Carbon Emissions

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The World Economic Forum’s analysis found that effective side-by-side parking enforcement, or allowing courier vehicles to use fast lanes, could reduce congestion by 29 per cent and 18 per cent, respectively. Provision for night delivery could have a similar impact, reducing congestion by 15 per cent and 28 per cent on delivery costs.

Researchers at the forum called the same-day and instant delivery service “the fastest growing part of the last mile environment” and estimated that by 2025, same-day delivery will account for 15 percent of all online orders in the United States.

If current trends continue, it will be difficult for the world’s largest cities to achieve the decarbonization target as the number of delivery vehicles increases.

The report’s authors warn that without any voluntary or authorized intervention by governments and participants in the last mile ecosystem, “e-commerce and related last-mile traffic will immediately pose serious challenges to cities in the next one to three years.” “