Study: Resilient slow-moving animals are less tolerant of climate change than they thought

According tomedia reports, it is well known that slow-moving animals (water bear worms) are one of the most tenacious animals on earth, but they also have their own limitations. New research suggests they may be more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought. Slow-step animals are one of the few animals that survived the Earth’s five mass extinctions, able to withstand extreme heat, cold, radiation, stress and lack of food, water and oxygen.

Study: Resilient slow-moving animals are less tolerant of climate change than they thought

To do this, they press their bodies so tightly that in practice they rearrange their internal organs and thus enter a state called cryptobiosis. This function is like hibernation, it protects animals from dangerous environments, and they wake up when the environment becomes more favorable.

But in a new study, researchers at the University of Copenhagen found that they may be more susceptible to the effects of climate change than previously thought. The team studied the survival skills of slow-moving animals by calculating the average death rate of their activities and hibernation.

The researchers found that the average death temperature of active slow-walking animals was only 37.1 degrees Celsius, while the average fatal temperature of the slow-moving animals in hibernating was 82.7 degrees Celsius, but the fatal temperature dropped to 63.1 degrees C if they were cooked for 24 hours.

Of course, this study has its limitations. The team only tested one of 1,300 slow-moving animals, and the results may not be available to all slow-moving animals. While some slow-moving animals may be more vulnerable than people think, they may eventually have to wait until the sun dies to wipe them out completely.