People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson’s disease in the future

Microbes and gut bacteria are playing a role in slowing down Parkinson’s disease, a new study has shown in recent years. In the course of Parkinson’s disease, protein abnormalities associated with nerve damage are often presented, and the paper, published in Cell Reports, outlines how a particular probiotic prevents the accumulation of these proteins.

People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson's disease in the future

One of the characteristics of Parkinson’s disease is the death of progressive cells that secrete neurons in the brain. Current scientific studies have shown that this is due to the aggregation of spherical misfolded clumps of the protein alpha-synaptic nucleus protein. These toxic protein aggregates are commonly referred to as Lewy bodies.

People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson's disease in the future

Over the past few decades, some researchers have begun to find evidence that Parkinson’s disease may have originated in the gut. The idea, called The Braak hypothesis, assumes that the destructive Louis body may initially form in the intestines and then spread to the brain and produce the physiological symptoms that are common in Parkinson’s disease.

People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson's disease in the future

Inspired by this hypothesis, a team of researchers from the University of Edinburgh and the University of Dundee set out to study whether any particular species of gut bacteria can inhibit or even reverse the accumulation of these harmful alpha-synaptic nucleoprotein clumps.

People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson's disease in the future

The researchers studied the effects of many common probiotics on alpha-Synuclein aggregation, an effective animal model of Parkinson’s disease, and finally the team found that the special probiotic bacteria of bacillus spore not only inhibited alpha-synaptic nucleoprotein aggregation. And in reversing pre-formed accumulation, there are significant effects.

People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson's disease in the future

The researchers did stress that these results did not mean that people with Parkinson’s would immediately go out looking for this particular probiotic. Before human studies can determine whether this mechanism has clinical implications for human patients, further work is needed to validate these results in other animal models first.

People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson's disease in the future

Maria Doitsidou, lead researcher on the study, explained: “The results provide an opportunity to study how the bacteria that make up the gut microbiome affect Parkinson’s disease. The next step is to confirm these results in mice and then conduct a quick clinical trial because the probiotics we tested are already available. “

People may be able to take the probiotic to slow down Parkinson's disease in the future